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diana

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About diana

  • Rank
    Morchella Senior Member

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    RIVERVIEW fl
  • Interests
    mushroom identification

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  1. diana

    Trichoderma peltatum?

    I don't remember where exactly the spores dropped from BUT the log that the first one came from is producing another in the same location. I brought the log onto the screened porch and put a piece of foil under the log to catch any spores since I have no idea when this thing would be mature enough to produce. (Small log only brought in so that DH does not do anything with it by accident.)
  2. This is just the tip of the iceburg! Do not buy a house because you love the old trees. It's costing us a fortune removing the trees as they die. These are large oaks that only live about 50 years. Water oaks. Cost about $5000 to have removed. Did have one grandfather oak on the property -- they live for several hundred years -- but had to have that removed because the roots were lifting the house!! I see the honeys and note another tree dying . Pretty soon we will have a naked yard. I could have found a house with no trees if I had wanted one. Live and learn. 😭
  3. diana

    Mushrooms in Lidl

    I'm going to check my local Aldi for mushrooms. We have a great market in Tampa, Sanwa, that is right next to the wholesale farmers market. Worth the trip into Tampa for me for the unusual veggies and gourmet mushrooms. Great prices of fresh food. The main store caters to restaurant supply, large size canned and dry goods and way too expensive.
  4. Here I am, stuck in the middle with you. " This is a picture of my backyard. Doesn't do it justice. Can't seem to get the feeling of being surrounded to photograph. This is the greatest concentration here but believe me, there is more! I've parboiled and froze enough of young ones to get me through the year. The rest are just wasted.
  5. diana

    Polypore ID help

    This is exactly what I have been finding here in the Tampa Bay area. There is a discussion going on now on this board. https://wildmushroomhunting.org/index.php?/topic/4709-trichoderma-peltatum/
  6. diana

    Trichoderma peltatum?

    I had already picked the younger one yesterday to try for a spore print. I will put both in the dehydrator and keep a lookout for more. If I do find another I will let it mature in order to collect spores. They are very leathery and should dry fine whole.
  7. diana

    Trichoderma peltatum?

    I did find the original mushroom in my compost bin. (not really a bin or correct compost heap since it's never layered or turned) Seems in good shape. I did look for the other one I saw growing and couldn't find it but did find a young something that looks like it will grow up to be identical. No spore print from either. Since these are pretty solid and I think they would travel well should I just put in a padded envelope and send whole as is to you? Mushroom Observer is where I found the id. I often look there to see what people are finding currently in Florida. Helps narrow down on the identifications also. That is how I stumbled onto this https://mushroomobserver.org/343815?q=abZ5 Good to know, do all spores need to be mounted in liquid? I will practice doing that since I have a little kit that has stains and such that came with the microscope. I do need to practice using the scope and get familiar with it.
  8. diana

    Trichoderma peltatum?

    Just about all you wrote is Greek to me. Funny, I came across another one on Thursday. It may be still be there - don't know how long these last. I do have a microscope that I purchased for the purpose of looking at spores but have yet to do so. I suppose that the best way to collect spores for the scope would be to put the (drawing a blank here dang it) that piece of glass you put things on to view or would that be to dense to see? But sure, you can use my pictures and if still in the yard I'll send you the dried specimen and spores.
  9. diana

    Trichoderma peltatum?

    Thanks Dave! Spore print was a shade of white. Had this sitting on my stovetop which is black and printed by accident. An offwhite.
  10. Found an oddball and may have lucked into an identification. Does this look right? No mention on Mushroom expert about spore print which is abundant and a creamish in color. Growing from a short sweetgum log.
  11. diana

    Are these honey mushrooms

    I have seen gilled boletes growing directly from trees. I have even come across them growing from palms/palmettos. First time thought it was an oddity but have stumbled upon this too often
  12. diana

    Armillaria tabescens?

    doesn't look like honeys to me. Cap surface missing velvet texture/fuzz.
  13. diana

    Pluteus cervinus

    Thanks Dave. Since I usually see both growing habits at the same time (some growing on log and some growing in wood chips or buried roots) would both varities exist at the same time? Also, if found somewhere that has not been dosed by DH with pesticide, I take it they are interchangeable as far as harvesting/consuming goes?
  14. diana

    Honeys ID

    I often over consume perogies also . Seems like that would be the way to go to protect against too much mushrooms and extend a small amount since perogies hold only a tablespoon or so. How do you make your filling? Straight seasoned mushrooms or mixed with potato? I love that there are real cooks on this board! Everyone looks at me crazy for the cooking I do. Only downside is that restaurants are such a disappointment.
  15. diana

    Pluteus cervinus

    Started out as a gray bell shape yesterday but I didn't take a picture, too depressed. Decided to put on my big girl pants and went out this morning. Growing from log. Heavy and firm. Spore print on the curved stem is cinnamon brown. Been finding similar throughout the year but growing on mulch/leaf litter/compost. I didn't do a taste test because the log that it is growing from is DH's project and he has heavily fumigated (carpenter ants) to turn into lumber.
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