Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Past hour
  2. vitog

    Genetic Diversity

    The mycelium and the mushrooms will have the same genome as the original cloned mushroom. The spores produced by the mushrooms will also be based on the same genome and thus will not have any genetic diversity. However, I don't know if all the spores contain the entire genome; they may contain only part of the original. Genetic diversity will only occur after the hyphae (or other structures) from the spores mate with compatible structures from different mushrooms. The mating methods vary among different species and may be quite complicated; some fungi can even mate with themselves. The point is that the genome of any offspring of the cloned fungus will only be different from the original genome after mating with a different fungus has occured.
  3. Marte

    Southern Louisiana seeking Foraging buddies :)

    I live on 12 acres, shared with 2 other homes, one with a couple & one with a single gentleman. The property has some wooded areas, a small pond, assorted fruit trees, flowering bushes, etc., and a good deal of mostly cleared Area with trees here and there. I have no idea if this is a likely scenario for foraging or not. What I do know is that those of us who live here do not forage, and would not mind a guest doing so. I am a senior citizen and not really in hiking shape. But I would be open to having up to a couplethree folks come out and look around and see if there are things that I would be happy to share that are just going to waste. I enjoy experimenting with ingredients when cooking. If this property is not suitable, I also have a fair amount of childcare experience and would happily babysit in exchange for wild edibles! I just saw a photo of the most immense morels I’ve ever seen, gathered somewhere in the area of my hometown of Moline Illinois. Do they grow here??? It’s been decades, but I still remember well their wonderful flavor. marte
  4. Today
  5. catphysh

    Coral

    Really, Dave, thank you. It's incredibly generous for all of you to share your time and expertise so freely. If you ever have Java or JavaScript questions then let me know. It's the only way I can reciprocate.
  6. Dave W

    Coral

    I think there are two different species seen here. The larger beige ones with the pointed branch-ends are likely a species of Ramaria. Coral mushrooms representing genus Ramaria can be very difficult to pin down to species. It's possible the smaller white ones are the same species as the larger ones, only younger. But, I think these are a different species. The branch tips do not taper to sharp points like what is seen with the larger ones. My best guess for the smaller white ones is Ramariopsis kunzei.
  7. Dave W

    Cinnabar?

    Those do look like Cantharellus cinnabarinus. Southern areas of eastern NA also get a species called C. texensis. This type is virtually identical to C. cinnabrinus.
  8. Dave W

    Just curious

    There may or may not be two different species here. The top photo shows a mushroom with closely space gills. Looks like a species of either Russula or Lactarius. If it's a Lactarius mushroom, then you should be able to find some "latex", a liquid that oozes from injured gills/flesh. Best way to check is to run a knife across the gills and then check to see if any liquid develops on the injury. Sometimes a Lactarius mushroom may contain a very small amount of latex, in which case you may need to gently press either your finger or a piece of paper against a cut, and then check for signs of moisture. If a Lactarius mushroom is harvested and then it sits around for hours, the latex may mostly disappear as the mushroom becomes drier. This first mushroom could be either Lactarius subvellereus or Russula brevipes. The mushroom with the gills more widely spaced and seen further down in the sequence of photos may or may not be the same species as the other mushroom. Sometimes a mushroom has gills more closely spaced when young. The areas between the gills may stretch out a bit as the mushroom matures. So, I think the same two species possibilities mentioned also apply to this mushroom.
  9. Monstarules

    Edibility of Hypomyces hyalinus

    I'm somewhat experienced with blushers. I definitely wouldn't eat the brown blusher, it's definitely poisonous but the rest of the blusher family is probably fine. The Amanita Eater though, I've seen growing on destroying angels. I absolutely will not touch any mushroom touched by it.
  10. You have some Interesting experiences with blushers Monstarules, thanks for your input. I suspect similar things occurring in areas where these mushrooms appear together and if Hypomyces hyalinus is common as well folks are probably eating some slightly to fully parasitized blushers if it is a local custom in rural areas. I have no proof of this happening though, it may or may not be the case in latin America where blushers are commonly eaten, though I am only speculating here as I don't known how far south Hypomyces hyalinus goes. A few more photos on the blusher/Hypomyces hyalinus situation in my area in New Brunswick. These photos are from blushers growing under birch and aspen. I have only eaten blushers and have not tried any I consider parasitized.
  11. Hello everyone. This is my first post so excuse me if I mess up protocol. If I take a biopsy from a mushroom and start a culture on a plate, then inoculate some liquid media to eventually onto fruiting substrate. This mycelium is a clone from the initial mushroom correct? Now if I get mushrooms fruiting from the substrate and take a spore print, how much genetic diversity from the original mushroom if any do I get from that? Thanks everyone!
  12. catphysh

    Coral

    This is my last post. Lucky for all of you my phone is about to die. My wife and I went out today for a long hike and found all sorts of interesting things. We have lots of this coral that ranges from beige to brown. This was all found in the same area high on a shady bank.
  13. catphysh

    Cinnabar?

    This is another mushroom we've seen several small patches of this summer. They are small and delicate... we haven't seen any large ones. We think Cinnabar. Any takers? 😁
  14. catphysh

    Just curious

    We have found a few of these this summer always growing near golden chanterelle. They are much more firm than the chants. Sorry for the dirty mushrooms... anyone familiar with these?
  15. Yesterday
  16. Sherwood

    Chanterelles?

    Thanks guys! I was almost 100% sure they were chants. I've seen tons of posts here about them. Just like posting here to get reassured. :)
  17. Dave W

    Photos Don't Do Justice

    Matt, are you certain that the one you had found was not Bondarzewia berkeleyi (Berkeley's Polypore)? Young Berkeley's looks like a stalagmite.
  18. MattVa

    Photos Don't Do Justice

    Dave, I found some frond stage black staining polypore once that would take several (longer than 5) minutes to stain. Not sure of this was a common occurrence? The ones I'm referring to where younger,more yellowish and just emerging like stalagmites and very very moist/juicy. I never recall them ever being this dark not even after they where massive.
  19. Dave W

    Chicken of the Woods?

    IMO, too old to eat. Insect infestation is bad enough. But old Laetiporus mushroom usually has a woody texture and is difficult to digest. The mushroom seen in the photos looks like an old Laetiporus cincinnatus, which is a really good edible when in better condition.
  20. Dave W

    Chanterelles?

    Yup, one of the types of classic American chanterelle formerly classified as Cantharellus cibarius. I haven't yet learned the several different new species names for eastern NA classic chants. They are all excellent edibles. Good to also learn to recognize Hygrophoropsis aurantiaca and the toxic Omphalotus illudens, as they may be mistaken for classic yellow chanterelles.
  21. Dave W

    Zellers?

    I believe X. atropurpureus is a species recently split off of X. zelleri. What at least some field guides picture as X. zelleri is probably actually X. atropurpureus. But, since I have never found either species of west coast bolete, I don't really know how to distinguish one from the other.
  22. Dave W

    Photos Don't Do Justice

    Mushroom Expert says the individual fronds on Meripilus sumstinei reach a width of 20 cm (~8 inches) and the whole fruit body is 12 inches or more wide. I have seen examples where the entire fruit body is well over 24 inches wide and the individual fronds are larger than 8 inches. It's not the size that causes me to wonder about the M. sumstinei ID proposal; it's the lack of black staining as seen in the photos. Did you notice any darkening or black staining, especially neat the edges of the fronds and possibly only after handling them? If the mushroom has further matured, then there may be a better chance to see the staining.
  23. EatTheWeeds

    Chicken of the Woods?

    Too old to eat? There were a lot of bugs and larvae near the base...
  24. 1shotwade

    Chicken of the Woods?

    Chicken of the woods! Plenty old! Wade
  25. EatTheWeeds

    Chicken of the Woods?

    I found this large clump near the base of an oak tree. If it is Chicken of the Woods, is it too mature to be eaten?
  26. Monstarules

    Edibility of Hypomyces hyalinus

    1left I have accidentally eaten a number of A. flavorubens/A. flavourubecens when mixed with other blushers and I haven't suffered ill effects. About a week ago I also (purposely) ate some. They taste fine, and I did not suffer poisoning. I'm interested in finding some more, but there's been a spell of dry weather recently. My theory is that a majority of "yellow blusher" poisonings are due to confusion with the fly agaric and yellow patches. There aren't any reports of amatoxins in yellow blushers, and it seems that the reported toxins are muscarine and ibotenic acid, which can apparently be cooked out. You already are supposed to cook blushers very well because they are dangerous to consume when raw. Tldr: I eat A. flavorubens/flavourubecens and I've personally not suffered any I'll effects. Several mushroom guides have disputed reports, some calling it choice, some calling it poisonous, and some calling it into question because of the mixed reports.
  27. Thanks for everyone’s help, I made the recipie ‘chanterelles in brandy cream sauce’ from Michael kuos’ book 100 edible mushrooms, which is a fantastic book that I would highly recommend if your main interest is edible mushrooms, like mine. I would agree with kuos’ description that they have a meaty texture and a fruity flavor (although I was surely getting some taste of the apricot flavored brandy I used in the recipie).
  28. vitog

    Chanterelles?

    Those are definitely Chanterelles, probably in the "cibarius" group, but I'm not familiar with the eastern species.
  1. Load more activity
×