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  1. Today
  2. svs

    Hydnum?

    Thank you GCn15. I tried some. It was good but sandy. I face this issue often it NJ with its sandy soil. Some mushrooms are almost impossible to clean out of sand of found on sandy patch.
  3. Found these by an old oak stump. Was wondering if they are honey mushrooms. Working on spore print now.
  4. Thanks for your reply, Spore print was brown! They were growing individually though which makes me think they're galerinas
  5. GCn15

    Hydnum?

    Hydnum umbilicatum seems like the most likely proposal. Excellent edible.
  6. Could be Ringless honey mushrooms (armillaria tabescens). Could be galerinas, although they look a lot more like honeys to me. Spore print needed. Definitely not a psychedelic of any kind.
  7. Dave W

    Need help with id !

    I think these are a species of Coprinellus. But, two other possibilities for the genus are Coprinopsis and Parasola.
  8. MattVa

    My hens-of-the-woods

    EB,I don't think anyone has forgotten that post ,that was stellar. Fall mushroom patterns have had me guessing a little this year. I found several flushes of Honey's last Tuesday and I thought they where finished. It's been good for hens this fall,this tree has had 7-8 each year but always flushes late. Typically around Halloween give or take a week. My only complaint is that I have not had much time to hunt this season.
  9. Monk

    Hen temps

    Will hens fruit and grow with temps in the high 40s but 30s overnight? North Ga has gotten a ton of rain the past two days, with more to come, but the cold has moved in fast. October was still hot, now I feel like the cool Fall weather is getting cut short. I'm just afraid a long cold spell is going to end the Fall mushroom season already.
  10. Yesterday
  11. 1shotwade

    Just sharing!

    Here's an interesting article someone posted. I thought I'd share with Y'all! Wade https://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/mushroom-species-looks-humans/?fbclid=IwAR0o4wOhkLMPW__2SDTfil0etNR6
  12. Hello everyone, I Live in southern Ontario , and today I found a ton of mushrooms near maple tree roots. I think they are galerinas but just wanted to confirm that they are not cubescens or any other type of psychedelic mushroom. Brown caps, whitish brown/grey/white twisty stipes , light brown gills, No brusing on any of them as far as I can see, I don't know why but they didn't really leave any spore print after 45 mins of sitting under a glass, please lmk if you know what these are asap thank you.
  13. eat-bolete

    My hens-of-the-woods

    Matt, I should be careful about what I tell you, your memory is too good:)) What’s interesting is, as fruitful as this year was, that tree produced only about 15 hens, and much smaller in size too. Awesome job helping out those in mushrooms need!
  14. Does anyone know what mushroom is this?
  15. MattVa

    My hens-of-the-woods

    Angela, your always welcome to come back again. That one old oak definitely flushes more than I need. Congrats on having them on your land thats a really special one to add to the list. eat-bolete, haha 47.... wasn't it? And a maple to boot. Old Oak, I try to be and Angela was good people as we like to say so we talked about all sorts of things. I'm glad she took me up on the offer because I hate to see them go to waste.
  16. Old Oak

    My hens-of-the-woods

    Super nice gesture! You’re a good dude Matt!
  17. Dave W

    What this can be?

    Looks like the gills are turning black. If so, this eliminates Conocybe apala (reddish-brown gills). I think these may be Panaeolina foenisecii (aka. Panaeolus foenisecii). Or maybe another species of Panaeolus. Also possible, genus Coprinellus. Need a closer look at caps and gills.
  18. eat-bolete

    My hens-of-the-woods

    Matt, I’ve never tasted hens before.
  19. MattVA noticed that I commented on never having had a hen-of-the-woods. He very kindly fixed that a week or so ago. His grandmother had some growing around an old red oak on her property. He invited me out there, and gave me a couple hens. I got to see them growing. I got to taste them. It was A LOT of hen. I've included a picture of what he gave me, minus a little I sauteed in order to taste it and to see how I did eating it. It is an excellent mushroom. The flavor is very good, and it keeps a little crispiness even after cooking. I've had it sauteed, on pizza, in stir-fry, and the base cut as a thin steak, marinated in an Asian-style marinade, and fried like a small steak. Mostly I've dried it. I tried very hard to describe to my husband what it looked like growing. We went to a local park where we thought there were old red oaks (Larus). We found a number of big, old oaks, but now more hens (I just wanted to show him what they looked like growing--believe me, we did not need to harvest any more.) We found blewits (which I think are slimy). Yesterday, when my husband went to our hunting land for muzzle-loader deer season, he came home deerless, but he brought me two small (thank goodness) hens-of-the-woods. We've been looking for them for two seasons but just didn't know what to look for. They were by one of the big (but not the biggest) red oaks at the edge of our property (the very edges have the biggest trees). I think I'm going to try freezing these. So, I still haven't found my own, but my husband has. I'm delighted I grow it on my property. I seem to grow almost everything there. It is a very mushroomy 12 acres. I couldn't ask for better. The hen is an amazing mushroom, and a large one is a lot of food. I'm very impressed and will keep my eye out a bit yet this year so I can try to find my own, and I'll definitely want more by next fall. I'll need to figure out lots more things to do with it, and see how it rehydrates this winter. THANKS, MATT!
  20. Last week
  21. Andri

    What this can be?

    I found this mushrooms in the park near to my house inba grassy area close to beech .
  22. eat-bolete

    Help with Id

    Thanks Dave. I did another spore print and it came out yellowish, so most likely C. robusta it is. Didn’t eat it.
  23. eat-bolete

    Which Tricholoma?

    Not sure why photos uploaded in a different order I intended so all my references are wrong. Yes, the brown-spored one is on photo 7, also on 1, and top mushroom on photo 3. The brown-spored one is the one that smelled mild and tasted pleasant, and had a bit slippery cap surface. Unfortunately, no microscope atm, every penny goes towards getting a house :)) species of Inocybe sounds right. Here’s another photo of spore print (top) compared to that of Cortinarius (bottom)
  24. svs

    Hydnum?

    Thank you Dave. Yes, I heard about NJ club. I had in mind to join them for couple forays this summer, especially spring one, when they find morels occasionally, but each time I had some scheduling conflict. Hopefully next summer will be more successful.
  25. Dave W

    Hydnum?

    There are a few genera of "tooth mushrooms" other than Hydnum... Sarcodon, Hydnellum, Bankera, to name a few. But the orange ones seen her are almost certainly Hydnum. Small size and pine habitat suggests H. umbilicatum. But there are other possibilities for the species. Svs, are aware of the New Jersey Mycological Association? NJMA is a really good mushroom club. They have forays all over NJ. (I am a member.)
  26. Dave W

    Help with Id

    Clitocybe robusta has what I perceive as a strange odor... sweetish, but sorta sickly sweetish. Perception of odor is fairly subjective. I once ate half a meal that included C. robusta. (I had mis-IDed them as Lepista irina.) The other half of the meal... I threw it out. The mushrooms tasted lousy. C. robusta is a late-season saprobe that favors beds of coniferous needles, but is also found in a variety of forest settings.
  27. Dave W

    Pluteus cervinus

    The only Pluteus species I have eaten are P. cervinus and P. petasatus. I liked P. petasatus better. But these days I rarely take home Pluteus mushrooms for consumption. The blue staining species like P. americanus may be psychoactive. I have not eaten P. tomentosulus.
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