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  1. Today
  2. Chris

    Oyster Mushrooms?

    Thanks, Dave. Your explanation has been extremely helpful! Thanks for your time. Chris
  3. A Michelin star chef wouldn't confuse morels for other mushrooms. I have a feeling the morels were not the issue. And the article says they had multiple courses in a tasting menu at the restaurant. Maybe it wasn't mushrooms at all.
  4. Yesterday
  5. Dave W

    Oyster Mushrooms?

    Odor of Pleurotus mushrooms has been described as... like anise or like ocean breeze. Describing an odor is rather subjective. I would say that oyster mushrooms have a pleasant odor. The appearance of the spore print --whitish against black and subtly smoky against white-- is a good indicator of P. ostreatus.
  6. Chris

    Oyster Mushrooms?

    Thanks so much, Dave, for getting back to me promptly on this. Your feedback is helpful. My wife and I did smell them but could not place the smell. We thought it might match the "anise-like sweetness and mushroomy earthy tones" described by Noah Siegel and Christian Schwarz in Mushrooms of the Redwood Coast but we could not really be sure. Is there a certain odor profile that you look for when identifying Pleurotus? I think your assessment of the spore color is about right. The print looks very white against the dark-brown table but smoky against the white paper.
  7. Last week
  8. Dave W

    Oyster Mushrooms?

    These look like a species of Pleurotus to me (Oyster Mushrooms). Growth on wood supports this ID proposal. Did you smell them? Looking at the photo of the spore print, I think I see a slight smoky tinge against the white background. If so, then this supports a proposal of Pleurotus ostreatus.
  9. Dave W

    Is this Lion's Mane?

    Maybe make a post onto the "What Kinds of Mushrooms are You Growing?" thread.
  10. Chris

    Oyster Mushrooms?

    I'm having a hard time positively identifying oyster mushrooms (even though most books say this is a good species for beginners because of "few lookalikes") and would love some tips and clarification. I feel like there are many mushrooms that fit all of the criteria but still look disimilar to one another. I found this specimen in mid March growing on a rotting Tan Oak log in the San Francisco Bay Area about a week after heavy rains. Spores are white (see white spores in third photo). The two specimens came from the same log. The smaller one is more representative of the shape (fan-like) and size (silver dollar) of most of the fruit on the log. The larger more symmetrical version was an outlier. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!!
  11. HvHunter

    Hey folks

    Hey Bowguy. I'm from this area, northeastern to you? Maybe Warmer in NJ, Season begins earlier? Audubon Field guide book has been a great resource. Well organized, descriptions and extensive color pics. I began enjoying chicken of the woods thanks to posting online forum pics too. Wary of trying others without an expert identifier. Person w me. The online identifiers have been confusing for me to use. Hope to post new pics soon. Spring begins next week!
  12. Dave W

    Found In Pennsylvania

    I think maybe you finalized the original post before the photos had loaded. I still think Perenniporia is a good possibility. But, looking again at Mushroom Expert, P. ohiensis forms very small fruit bodies. So, this species should probably be eliminated from consideration.
  13. D J

    Is this Lion's Mane?

    That makes sense, especially after I looked up more info on that species. It does always grow as a single head instead of branching out the spines, has longer than 1cm spines and I find it on living, wounded oaks. I plucked up my courage and cooked a small piece, and it tastes very much like crab meat. My parents will be over the moon to find I have this growing here, they've tried plugging trees with lions mane before with no luck and my dad swears by the dried version for migraines. Can anybody share a way for me to be able to use the specimens I have for them to be able to grow it on their property? Thank you so very much for all the advice and information!
  14. JuniperWillows

    Found In Pennsylvania

    Thank you so much! I am not sure why the other photos did not appear
  15. Dave W

    Found In Pennsylvania

    Resupinate fungi --consisting entirely of a pore surface that spreads across the substrate-- can be difficult to ID to species. I think a good place to start with the one seen here is genus Perenniporia. Two possibilities appear to be P. podocarp and P. ohiensis. http://www.hiddenforest.co.nz/fungi/family/polyporaceae/polyp08.htm http://www.mushroomexpert.com/perenniporia_ohiensis.html Although, my response is based upon the ONE photo seen above. Is this the one mentioned as "under a dissection microscope"? If so, it would be useful to also see the fungus as it appears to the naked eye.
  16. JuniperWillows

    Found In Pennsylvania

    I am trying to identify fungi for a project and this one is not keying out correctly. I found this one growing on wood in the fall in Pennsylvania. The second image is under a dissection microscope. Any suggestions would help. Thank you!
  17. HvHunter

    Tri State & New England

    Anyone else local? I have lived here, explored these woods for years and began harvesting and identifying. I believe I was on this forum or another previously (lost all my passwords w old computer) and moderator Dave may have helped me identify the robust chickens I found (among other interesting but inedibles). Learned a lot but so much more... Looking forward to the new season :) Will post pics of finds!
  18. Dave W

    Kansas Mushroom

    It's pretty common for Oyster Mushrooms to pop during a winter warm spell.
  19. Adam in Kansas

    Kansas Mushroom

    No different tree then the org post. They prob did take a beating due to the cold weather that came though.
  20. Dave W

    Kansas Mushroom

    These latest photos show a different fungus that is seen in the original post. I think these latest ones may be a species of Pleurotus (Oyster Mushroom). They're squeezing out from cracks/separations in the wood/bark of the tree. Plus, they appear to be probably several days old (darkened gill edged). So, I'm not highly confident in this ID proposal. Same tree? If so, then I'd say the tree is nearing its demise.
  21. Dave W

    Is this Lion's Mane?

    Looks like Hericium erinaceus (Lion's Mane) to me. H. erinaceus is an excellent edible mushroom. It should always be cooked. Chunks may be added to stir fries, or sauteed/baked alongside fish or seafood. Dried material is available in Asian import stores; I add pieces to miso soup. Interesting seeing what appears to be this species occurring (in the northern hemisphere) just before the onset of spring. It seems to be a somewhat uncommon species here in NE PA (more common in areas just south of here). When I have seen this species it has been in late summer or early fall. Seasonal fruitings of mushrooms in southern NA are often much different than up here.
  22. Adam in Kansas

    Kansas Mushroom

    Found some more on my property. I was going to clean up the tree but now I will just leave it for the mushrooms. But thought it might be able to be eaten.
  23. Dave W

    2018 photos

    Amanita cyclops is a provisionally named species. Hopefully, the viability of this taxon at the level of species will stand the test of time. I am listed as one of the three co-authors of the species. Rod Tulloss and Linas Kudzma are other two coauthors. Rod is an authority on the genus Amanita; he has authored many species. Linas is a retired chemist who extracts DNA sequences in his basement lab. To date, I haven't seen any amanita observations that really look like A. cyclops, other than those I have collected. Rod has been studying section Vaginatae of genus Amanita for several years now. (It has been a daunting task, classifying the species that comprise this diverse group.) He has been accepting collections for study, and when I first collected this type --growing on a mowed path on my property-- it seemed to be unique. Subsequent fruitings of this fungus in the same spot produced mushrooms that had the same macro-characteristics... cap with dark central umbo and deeply grooved margin, short/squat stature. DNA sequences were obtained. Name looks good so far. Rod designated me as co-author on a few other provisional species names, including A. rooseveltensis (seen in the group directly above). We worked on one name together, Amanita advenienticometa ("Arriving Comet" Amanita). It was my idea, based upon the cap having streaks radially emanating from a dark disc... looked like material streaking off an approaching comet. But, as luck would have it, DNA analysis eventually showed "advenienticometa" is the same taxon as what Yves Lamoureux had previously named "Amanita elongatior". The older name took preference, and so my "comet amanita" disappeared into myco-space 😞 But, like other comets, it may return. Rod likes the name; he wants to eventually use it again. Pictured below. (Photos from 2014).
  24. Dave W

    Forest Clitocybe Ring?

    Let us know if you learn anything.
  25. Vermonter

    Forest Clitocybe Ring?

    This circle was very large as well. I thought it was a line at first, but as my eyes followed it, I realized it was arcing around. I just stumbled across a facebook group called "Clitocybe and Clitocyboid ID and Discussion" and have been looking at photos posted there. Thank you both for your input. I'm definitely going to look for these this summer.
  26. D J

    Is this Lion's Mane?

    Cut one to get a better picture. These kind of come and go throughout the warmer months, but always are growing in early spring. I might have got the yellow to white backwards, thanks for helping!
  27. The Vault Dweller

    Turkey Tail uses and benefits small research survey

    I would help if I can. I'm not sure what it is you need from participants though.
  28. The Vault Dweller

    Id please?

    I frequently find what seems to be algae (I figured bacteria growth at first) growing on old hard-bodied fungi like these.
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