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EatTheWeeds

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About EatTheWeeds

  • Rank
    Pleurotus Junior Member

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  • Location
    Illinois
  • Interests
    Mycology, foraging, sustainable living, wild edibles, photography

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  1. Glad this was already posted. I think I just found the same...? Here are photos. It was growing near chipped wood. The stem was hollow, with maybe a bit of a pithy center, and they didn't have any specific odor.
  2. I've been looking for them here, long before I knew the weather was right, but today I stumbled across my first M. Esculenta of the year! I'm elated! There were two others that hadn't fully developed, so I'll be back.
  3. Hey Dave. Do you post photos on Instagram too?
  4. Sounds like a feast! Can't wait for the weather to warm here so I can forage fiddleheads, wild leeks (ramps), and morels again!!! I know it's a bit off topic, but last year, I got scared, I'd picked the wrong fiddleheads, and didn't eat them. Would you be willing to ID my fiddleheads too, Dave? ­čśÇ
  5. Looks like yours are violating that parking ban, LOL! The ones I found are definitely not subject to any direct exposure to contamination. Going back to harvest some today. What's their flavor profile?
  6. I just found these at the base of an oak tree. Odor seemed slightly metallic. They seem a little dark, but appear to be in prime condition. Is there any possibility that they're *not* Hen of the Woods?
  7. Found these just to the right of the other boletes I just posted about. The cap is very hard, and brittle, and had a definite tendency to break off the stem with almost no effort from me. Even the pore surface seemed dried out! They are very photogenic however...
  8. Hi Dave. Maybe I should've done more research before posting, or perhaps I've done too much research now! I was looking, and the cap and description began to resemble Tylopilus indecisus to me... Maybe I'm over thinking this because nearby, I also found a bunch of what I'm guessing are tylopilus rubrobrunneus? I'll post photos of these in a minute... the trees both were directly under were mainly oak. I went back and gathered more of both mushrooms... The pores on these pull away from the cap very easily. Gonna try to get a spore print next.
  9. I wish I had more photos to share, but the other ones I have also have my little fellow forager in them. They formed a fairy ring on the ground, and all she wanted was for me to photograph her inside the ring! While they appear to be growing on the ground, I can't rule out whether or not they were really attached to the wood chips that covered this area heavily. Mushroom Identificator suggested that they might be Ramaria Stricta?
  10. Found these yesterday. There were conifer trees in the same forested area, however none near these guys. The caps were extremely spongy. Some of them stained brown as can be seen, and others (not pictured) looked identical, but stained a dark purple-brown. After taking the photos, I realized that the smaller one shown might not be the same species, but it was growing with them. The system were fibrous. What could they be?
  11. Just tasted my find 3 ways: drizzled with oil, salt, and pepper; sauteed; and sauteed with garlic. Texture was weird, but it tasted amazing! Thanks to a chef friend for cooking this up in exchange for a taste!
  12. So... Found these today. One probably weighs a pound and is 5+ inches in diameter. The skin oozed clear liquid when I broke it from it's stem / root? I know I'm a novice at this, but is there any doubt that these are edible Giant Puffball (calvatia gigantea)?
  13. Woohoo! Thanks so much Dave! As to edibility, other sites say, "you're on your own." I guess better safe than sorry. I hope to find more though!
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