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Mushrooms in my lemon tree pot


michi
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Hello

These mushrooms randomly started to grow beside my lemon tree. I'm wondering which species it is and whether I should get rid of it to protect my young lemon tree. If they are beneficial for my tree (which I learnt some mushrooms can be) I would leave them be and enjoy this little surprise :)

The pot they are growing in is indoors. I'm in Vancouver, Canada. The gills of the mushrooms are white. I can't smell any special odor, because the lemon leaves are overpowering. 

Thank you for your help! 

20190513_114029.jpg

Edited by michi
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It looks like Leucoagaricus americanus, the reddening lepiota, but Kuo says there are many small lepiotas that are hard to ID. There's a yellow lepiota, Leucocoprinus birnbaumii, that people find in their flower pots. Kuo says most are saprobic and won't harm plants. If you have young children or pets that would eat them, that could be a big problem as many mushrooms are poisonous. Dave W will be able to give more accurate info.

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I agree, these do look like Leucoagaricus americanus. How large is that pot? Unless it's massive, these are on the small size for this species. The habitat is certainly not typical. 

As bobby said, we need to also consider genus Lepiota here. Some Lepiota mushrooms are poisonous https://www.mycoquebec.org/bas.php?trie=L&l=l&nom=Lepiota felina / Lépiote féline&tag=Lepiota felina&gro=12  

Probably just L. americanus. But to be on the safe side, I suggest removing and discarding the mushrooms. 

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Thank you so much for your answers Bobby and Dave.

That pot is pretty small. The mushrooms are about the size of my thumb. So the Lepiota mushrooms seem to match better looking at the size of what's growing there.

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I see small Lepiotas like the ones in the photo frequently in the fall; but I avoid them and have never tried to identify them, because there are several similar species and some are known to be poisonous.  If there is any chance that someone or a pet might eat these, I would definitely remove them as soon as they appear.  Their presence or absence should have no impact on the plants in the pot.

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Very small  --size of a thumb-- favors genus Lepiota. Maybe L. cristata  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lepiota_cristata . 

Agree with vitog, removing the mushrooms will not negatively impact the plant in the pot. Lepiota mushrooms grow from a fungus that is saprobic (ie. not mycorrhizal; does not form a symbiotic relationship with a plant). 

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  • 2 years later...
  • 11 months later...

Best to create a new discussion when the topic is changed.

I don't have a confident ID proposal for this. But, I don't think it's a species of Pleurotus (ie. it's not an Oyster Mushroom). Maybe compare with species of Hohenbuehelia? If it's a species from this genus then microscopic analysis would be useful. 

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