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Dave W

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Everything posted by Dave W

  1. Dave W

    Oyster Mushrooms?

    Odor of Pleurotus mushrooms has been described as... like anise or like ocean breeze. Describing an odor is rather subjective. I would say that oyster mushrooms have a pleasant odor. The appearance of the spore print --whitish against black and subtly smoky against white-- is a good indicator of P. ostreatus.
  2. Dave W

    Oyster Mushrooms?

    These look like a species of Pleurotus to me (Oyster Mushrooms). Growth on wood supports this ID proposal. Did you smell them? Looking at the photo of the spore print, I think I see a slight smoky tinge against the white background. If so, then this supports a proposal of Pleurotus ostreatus.
  3. Dave W

    Is this Lion's Mane?

    Maybe make a post onto the "What Kinds of Mushrooms are You Growing?" thread.
  4. Dave W

    Found In Pennsylvania

    I think maybe you finalized the original post before the photos had loaded. I still think Perenniporia is a good possibility. But, looking again at Mushroom Expert, P. ohiensis forms very small fruit bodies. So, this species should probably be eliminated from consideration.
  5. Dave W

    Found In Pennsylvania

    Resupinate fungi --consisting entirely of a pore surface that spreads across the substrate-- can be difficult to ID to species. I think a good place to start with the one seen here is genus Perenniporia. Two possibilities appear to be P. podocarp and P. ohiensis. http://www.hiddenforest.co.nz/fungi/family/polyporaceae/polyp08.htm http://www.mushroomexpert.com/perenniporia_ohiensis.html Although, my response is based upon the ONE photo seen above. Is this the one mentioned as "under a dissection microscope"? If so, it would be useful to also see the fungus as it appears to the naked eye.
  6. Dave W

    Kansas Mushroom

    It's pretty common for Oyster Mushrooms to pop during a winter warm spell.
  7. Dave W

    Kansas Mushroom

    These latest photos show a different fungus that is seen in the original post. I think these latest ones may be a species of Pleurotus (Oyster Mushroom). They're squeezing out from cracks/separations in the wood/bark of the tree. Plus, they appear to be probably several days old (darkened gill edged). So, I'm not highly confident in this ID proposal. Same tree? If so, then I'd say the tree is nearing its demise.
  8. Dave W

    Is this Lion's Mane?

    Looks like Hericium erinaceus (Lion's Mane) to me. H. erinaceus is an excellent edible mushroom. It should always be cooked. Chunks may be added to stir fries, or sauteed/baked alongside fish or seafood. Dried material is available in Asian import stores; I add pieces to miso soup. Interesting seeing what appears to be this species occurring (in the northern hemisphere) just before the onset of spring. It seems to be a somewhat uncommon species here in NE PA (more common in areas just south of here). When I have seen this species it has been in late summer or early fall. Seasonal fruitings of mushrooms in southern NA are often much different than up here.
  9. Dave W

    2018 photos

    Amanita cyclops is a provisionally named species. Hopefully, the viability of this taxon at the level of species will stand the test of time. I am listed as one of the three co-authors of the species. Rod Tulloss and Linas Kudzma are other two coauthors. Rod is an authority on the genus Amanita; he has authored many species. Linas is a retired chemist who extracts DNA sequences in his basement lab. To date, I haven't seen any amanita observations that really look like A. cyclops, other than those I have collected. Rod has been studying section Vaginatae of genus Amanita for several years now. (It has been a daunting task, classifying the species that comprise this diverse group.) He has been accepting collections for study, and when I first collected this type --growing on a mowed path on my property-- it seemed to be unique. Subsequent fruitings of this fungus in the same spot produced mushrooms that had the same macro-characteristics... cap with dark central umbo and deeply grooved margin, short/squat stature. DNA sequences were obtained. Name looks good so far. Rod designated me as co-author on a few other provisional species names, including A. rooseveltensis (seen in the group directly above). We worked on one name together, Amanita advenienticometa ("Arriving Comet" Amanita). It was my idea, based upon the cap having streaks radially emanating from a dark disc... looked like material streaking off an approaching comet. But, as luck would have it, DNA analysis eventually showed "advenienticometa" is the same taxon as what Yves Lamoureux had previously named "Amanita elongatior". The older name took preference, and so my "comet amanita" disappeared into myco-space 😞 But, like other comets, it may return. Rod likes the name; he wants to eventually use it again. Pictured below. (Photos from 2014).
  10. Dave W

    2018 photos

    2018 was a good year for mushrooms here in NE PA, especially from mid July through most of November. The annual precipitation measured at our local NOAA set a new record by over an inch! Remembering some nice finds. Boletus edulis. The ones in the photo are more red than usual, for the local type(s). I submitted several samples of local edulis to a researcher in Utah. Mycena crocea is the "Walnut Mycena". These were part of a group found growing on nuts/debris from a shagbark hickory tree. Most field guides use the name "Mycena luteopallens". I'd call this Hydnellum peckii, although there is a look-alike species. A species of Bisporella, very likely B. citrina. Even with spore measurements it's difficult to confidently ID to species. The always photogenic Amanita muscaria var. guessowii. Amanita jacksonii is the classic North American "Caesar's Amanita". The provisionally named species Amanita cyclops is presently only known to occur in one small patch on a path in the northwest corner of my property. Caloboletus inedulis has a very bitter taste.
  11. Dave W

    Forest Clitocybe Ring?

    Let us know if you learn anything.
  12. Dave W

    Forest Clitocybe Ring?

    I have seen L. albissimus forming large rings like this. But I have also seen other types of mushrooms in this growth pattern. Saprobic fungal species --like Clitocybe or Leucopaxillus-- sometimes consume nutrients in the substrate in arc/circle patterns that radiate over time. The size of the caps reported --up to 8 cm diameter-- eliminates both C. rivulosa and C. candicans (each with smaller caps). Leucopaxillus --maybe not L. albissimus-- looks like a possibility. Clitocybe phyllophila also looks like a viable possibility. Bottom line... need more info.
  13. Dave W

    Can Anyone ID?

    Except for the lack of banded/zonate cap surfaces, these look like Panaeolus cinctulus. Was the lawn where they were found recently fertilized? Pure black spore print supports a genus Panaeolus ID. What is your location?
  14. Dave W

    Forest Clitocybe Ring?

    Leucopaxillus albissimus is a good suggestion. Here are the main differences. 1. L. albissimus mushrooms are almost always larger and with thicker stipes than either C. rivulosa or C. candicans. 2. L. albissimus mushrooms have a lot of white mycelium extending from the stipe bases, and this mycelium tends to form an underground mat to which many mushrooms in a single group are connected. Sometimes it's possible to pull an entire cluster of L. albissimus out of the ground by extracting a piece of this mat of mycelium. 3. A L. albissimus mushroom has a layer of gills that is easily separated from the rest of the context that comprises the cap. Mushroom Expert reports a species similar to L. albissimus --Leucopaxillus laterarius-- that is found on the forest floor in hardwood litter. The difference separating L. laterarius form the small white Clitiocybe species are the same three as cited above., Distinguishing L. albissimus from some of the Clitocybe species that produce large fruit bodies is trickier.
  15. Dave W

    Found in FL unsure of ID

    That's a possibility, trout. Armillaria tabescens, the "Ringless Honey Mushroom".
  16. Dave W

    Forest Clitocybe Ring?

    Most of what I call Clitocybe rivulosa (aka. C. dealbata, C. sudorifica) I have found is open --usually grassy-- areas. On my own 4 acre property --on lawns, on mowed paths, near an unpaved gravel driveway-- I find what seems like a variety of small white funnel mushrooms. It's not unlikely they all represent the same species, C. rivulosa. Here's an example of one such observation that looks like yours, Vermonter https://mushroomobserver.org/220622?q=iqBx There are other species of small white Clitocybe mushrooms, and confidently IDing to species can be difficult. Looks like the ones seen here are occurring in a hardwood-dominated forest. One species name to consider is Clitocybe candicans. I notice the stipe has some white hairs/fuzziness. This is a trait Tim Baroni reports for C. candicans. C. dealbata/rivulosa has a smooth stipe. Another small white Clitocybe is C. compressipes. Mushrooms representing this species exhibit a longitudinal compression running down the stipe. Both C. compressipes and C. candicans have spores a bit longer and with larger l/w ratio than C. dealbata/rivulosa. I assume that you have observed a white spore print for these. But if not, then a similar-looking species with a pink spore print is Clitocella mundula (aka. Clitocella popinalis, Rhodocybe mundula). Mushrooms representing this species are typically much larger than any of the small white Clitocybe types mentioned.
  17. Dave W

    Please Identify

    These do look like a species of Cantharellus to me. "California Fungi" lists Cantharellus californicus as occurring form "fall to early spring". http://www.mykoweb.com/CAF/species/Cantharellus_californicus.html . I don't have first-hand experience with this west coast species, but the photos and timing seem to fit C. californucus. Best thing to do is find someone local who knows this species.
  18. Dave W

    brown mushroom foothills california

    Judging from the brown spore print (and the early-season occurrence), my best guess is this represents a species of Agrocybe. Species of Leratiomyces have darker spore prints.
  19. Dave W

    Found in FL unsure of ID

    These are kinda old/shriveled in order for a believable ID proposal. I *think* they are white-spored (low confidence here). If so, then maybe Gymnopus luxurians (or a similar species of Gymnopus). http://www.mushroomexpert.com/gymnopus_luxurians.html Very unlikely a species of Psilocybe. Not even close.
  20. Dave W

    Please Identify

    When and where (area of state, province, or country please)...?
  21. Dave W

    2018 photos

    I haven't used Instagram. Mostly I post mushroom photos here and on Mushroom Observer. Here's a few more from 2018. Horse Mushrooms (Agaricus, a species from section Arvenses. Agaricus section Xanthodermatei, with medicinal odor, probably a sickened. Agrocybe species (I think A. putaminum). Amanita brunnescens. Amanita rooseveltensis, a new provisionally named species that is common on lawns near oak or hickory. Amanita sinicoflava Auricularia (Tree Ears). For a short time the NA Tree Ear was called A. americana. Currently split into a few newly-named species. Baorangia bicolor, the classic "Two-color Bolete" (formerly Boletus bicolor).
  22. Dave W

    ID request

    Species of Panaeolus. Note the toothlike veil fragments lining the margins of the caps. This reminds me of the species P. papilionaceus, which generally grows on substrate that has been enriched with horse or cow dung. Species of Panaeolus can be difficult to nail down, and use of a microscope is often necessary.
  23. Dave W

    Id please?

    Yeah, that's a better suggestion... algae.
  24. Dave W

    Id please?

    Okay, here's my best guess for these goblet-shaped fungi... Podoscypha petalodes (possibly with moss on the concave surface) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Podoscypha_petalodes .
  25. Dave W

    Id please?

    The shape and wrinkled hymenium (fertile under-surface) remind me of genus Thelephora. But, the only such species that grows on wood is T. cuticularis, and the fruit bodies seen here don't look like this species. So, I think these are some sort of polypore, but nothing comes immediately to mind. If I get a better idea, I'll suggest it. For now... I'm stumped by this one!
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