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Phil

Macrolepiota recipes

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I found these Macrolepiota this morning in a sunny oak wood. Any ideas about how best to eat them?

I identify them by the distinctive cap and leopard skin stem with moveable double ring. Is that sufficent?

macrolepiota.JPG

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They look like Chlorophyllum Rhacodes, the shaggy parasol, which is edible.  A couple of the mature mushrooms in your basket don't have the shaggy cap and have a thinner stem.  A different species? Do a spore print on them.  Here in NA,  C. molybdites has a green spore print and is a common mushroom that makes people sick. Cut the shaggies top to bottom and they should stain a shade of pinkish orange or reddish & then brown. Your right about the pattern on the stem but Macrolepiota procera usually has a disproportionate thin long stem. Always a lot to think about. You should get some more comments from other on this site. 

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16 minutes ago, bobby b said:

They look like Chlorophyllum Rhacodes, the shaggy parasol, which is edible.  A couple of the mature mushrooms in your basket don't have the shaggy cap and have a thinner stem.  A different species? Do a spore print on them.  Here in NA,  C. molybdites has a green spore print and is a common mushroom that makes people sick. Cut the shaggies top to bottom and they should stain a shade of pinkish orange or reddish & then brown. Your right about the pattern on the stem but Macrolepiota procera usually has a disproportionate thin long stem. Always a lot to think about. You should get some more comments from other on this site. 

I took them to the council offices for checking. They rejected the one that you mention along with other smaller ones. They also removed all the stipes because they say they are indigestible. I asked If I could use them to make mushroom soup and they said certainly not! I had them for lunch.

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Well, it's nice to have local advise, keep the wild mushroom forum posted about mushrooms in central Italy.  good luck!

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They try to prevent admissions to hospital by offering a checking service. In August an entire family in Rome were badly poisoned with Amanita Phalloides that they thought were Amanita Caesarea.

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On ‎11‎/‎17‎/‎2018 at 11:47 PM, Phil said:

They try to prevent admissions to hospital by offering a checking service. In August an entire family in Rome were badly poisoned with Amanita Phalloides that they thought were Amanita Caesarea.

When I was young, in my hometown, we had a retired university professor who was a mycologist. Due to his health he couldn't get out in the field anymore so he would hire a bunch of us early teens to go mushroom pick for him and he paid us per basket. Anything and everything went into the basket, and he would sort them and teach us about various edibles to watch for as we brought them. Man...I wish I had listened a little better...lol.

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I'm doing a funghi course at the moment. The lecturer sometimes shows a picture of an edible variety and next to it a similar non edible type. It makes it clear that you have to be careful. 

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On 11/17/2018 at 11:47 PM, Phil said:

They try to prevent admissions to hospital by offering a checking service. In August an entire family in Rome were badly poisoned with Amanita Phalloides that they thought were Amanita Caesarea.

Must have been real amateurs to confuse those two. They look nothing at all alike.

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6 hours ago, Tasso said:

Must have been real amateurs to confuse those two. They look nothing at all alike.

Some people like to pick the A. Caesarea before they have emerged from the veil as white eggs. In that case there isn't so much difference. He might have picked a lot of "eggs" and not spotted the odd poisonous one in his basket. The council office won't check them because picking the eggs is illegal. Personally I wouldn't think of consuming the eggs. A. muscaria poisoning would be bad enough.

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