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What do u think these could be?


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I’m still uncertain about these. They smell a little fruity and taste the same as they smell. Spore print test didn’t work must’ve hurt it in my pocket. They were growing out of the ground in a hard wood forest. I have seen this species quite frequently here in Tennessee this winter. Any thoughts are greatly appreciated.

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Edited by Dave from tn.
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There appears to be material deposited on the stipe of the one mushroom. This is interesting because the mushrooms look very much like a species of Entoloma... except there are no Entoloma mushrooms that have partial veil (covering over the gills that sometimes forms a "ring" on the stalk). So, I'm wondering if what I'm seeing on the stipe is from a partial veil, as opposed to perhaps some splitting apart of the context that comprised the stalk. Were these observed recently? There are a few species of Entoloma that continue to fruit even after the weather starts to turn cold. There's a particular species that fruits in spring  https://mushroomobserver.org/65791?q=1ccBQ . 

Spore print color for Entoloma mushrooms are always some shade of tannish-to-salmon pinkish. Using a microscope to see the spores (400x magnification) is the way to determine with certainty that the mushroom represents genus Entoloma (or any of a few other closely related genera housed in Family Entolomataceae). 

Nice photos!

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I definitely see the resemblance! Maybe if they were more mature we could identify them a little better. I have seen them before. The stipe or scales are throwing me off. I added another close - up pic. I don’t know if the leaves I pulled off from around them had anything to do with it. I couldn’t get a spore print from it for some reason. Thx Dave!!

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My guess is the ornamentation on the stalks is not due to a partial veil. These really look like Entoloma to me, maybe E. vernum or something close to this species (the name may actually refer to a group of closely related species). There are no species in family Entolomataceae that have partial veil (that I know of). If there were leaves stuck to the stalks then removing the debris may have caused the surface to tear. But I also have another potential explanation. Many Entoloma mushrooms occur with copious whitish mycelium coating the bases of the stalks. I think it's possible for the expanding caps to grab/drag some of the mycelium up the stalks. A few of the photos seen in the following link appear to support this idea.  https://www.mycoquebec.org/bas.php?trie=E&l=l&nom=Entoloma vernum / Entolome printanier&tag=Entoloma vernum&gro=19

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If Entoloma, then spore print color would be very useful. Also, if you would like to save the spore print on foil or wax paper then  if you mail it to me I could scope the spores.

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