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Mushroom ID -Oregon - Willamette Valley - Fawn mushroom?


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Hi Folks,

 

This guy is growing with multiples next to an old Big Leaf Maple stump.

In the process of getting a spore sample. Will post if I can get a good one.

Smell is a nice earthy mushroom character.

thoughts?

-J

 

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They look like Pluteus cervinus (Deer/Fawn Mushroom) to me, but the name may have changed recently.  If it is, the gills should turn pink with age; and the spore print should be pinkish.  These are common in the Pacific Northwest in the fall.

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A key feature in IDing a mushroom to genus Pluteus is to observer whether the gills are attached to or free of the stalk. To this end it's best to photograph the underside of the cap with the stalk still attached to the cap. 

These mushrooms look like Pluteus to me, although as mentioned the print is kinda pale (at least for the types lumped into the P. cervinis complex). On the other hand, the print may be too thin to get a good read on the color. Maybe try to get a thicker print on a non-absorbent white surface? Or, perhaps these mushrooms represent a species of Pluteus other than P. cervinus? I'd feel better about providing an opinion if the gill attachment/unattachment was observable. 

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It's a Pluteus mushroom. Notice how the gills terminate in rounded edges that come up short of the stalk. There's a thin/smooth annular area on the cap underside comprising the separation between the gills and stalk. Looks like a species housed in section Pluteus of genus Pluteus, which is where the P. cervinus types are placed. Are these technically examples of P. cervinus? I think microscopy would be required to gain confidence one way or another. But, aside from the somewhat pale appearance of the spore print, these fit the general description of P. cervinus. 

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Thanks Dave.  The gills also (in the younger specimens) appear to be white, but when picked and handled, they turn pinkish-brown pretty quick...which appears to be another telltale sign of the P. cervinus, no?

 

 

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