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Would love help identifying this black (boletes?) mushroom!


Rachel L.
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Hi! I'm very new to mushroom finding/foraging and though I'm not at all ready to eat any of my finds, I'd love help identifying this black mushroom I found on a walk today. I believe it was growing nearby to some oak trees. Its cap is black/dark brown in color and the pores are black. When broken apart the profile of the pores are grey and the flesh pale grey, with the pores and flesh turning reddish before going fully dark grey/black. I hate to assume it is a T. alboater but wondered if someone could point me in a good direction for finding out what it might be?

Thank you so much! 

 I'm excited to continue learning about this fascinating kingdom!

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The pore surface color rules out tylopilus alboater, it would be either light grey or pinkish at that stage. T. Griseocarneus  is listed in North American Boletes as being from south jersey to florida and fits the description and the staining on the gills.

I didn't realize you had ripped it apart for the photo. I've been seeing black mushrooms like that all day, that were just old and rotten.

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With a really old dried-out mushroom, colors may be atypical for whatever species it represents. Although this may be a factor here, I think this is Tylopilus griseocarneus. Boletes of Eastern North America lists the range of this species as "New England South to Florida, west to Texas..." T. griseocarneus is suspected to be toxic, and I remember there being a discussion on this board in which someone reported getting pretty sick from this species. 

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