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Found this interesting red specimen, any clues?


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This year has been crazy in our garden, lots of different mushrooms growing with all the recent rain events. I wish I had time to analyze them all. But here’s the latest interesting one if found. Growing within a bed of moss. Unfortunately bugs got to it as you can see in the cross section shot. It smelled sharp like a portobello but earthier, if that makes any sense. The bottom made me think, some kind of bolete? 

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Does B. Bicolor get that red speckling on the pore surface? I was interested by that, wondering if they were developing into red as it matured or if it was staining or just unusual coloring? One of the endless provisional rules of thumb I keep in my head is "boletes with red pore surfaces are bad" haha, provisional because I'm sure that lacks nuance. I tried what I believe was b. bicolor once and it was excellent, but I wonder if I just got lucky, ever since I've just gotten more and more confused by the seemingly endless array of minor trait variations between the different yellow and red boletes, and I don't feel comfortable with my IDs of them anymore. So I'm always curious to get any info out there.

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22 minutes ago, The Mushroom Whisperer said:

Compare to Baorangia bicolor.  Not sure if that's what it is, but quite similar in appearance.

Did the pores bruise blue at all?

It didn’t bruise blue that I could tell. I pressed it against paper to see if it stained or made any kind of imprint, nothing. I think a bicolor is highly possible too, the top of it also resembles a B. Flammans, with that irregular cap. Are hybrids a thing? Haha.

9 minutes ago, brendan said:

Does B. Bicolor get that red speckling on the pore surface? I was interested by that, wondering if they were developing into red as it matured or if it was staining or just unusual coloring? One of the endless provisional rules of thumb I keep in my head is "boletes with red pore surfaces are bad" haha, provisional because I'm sure that lacks nuance. I tried what I believe was b. bicolor once and it was excellent, but I wonder if I just got lucky, ever since I've just gotten more and more confused by the seemingly endless array of minor trait variations between the different yellow and red boletes, and I don't feel comfortable with my IDs of them anymore. So I'm always curious to get any info out there.

Yeah I was thrown off by the red speckles as well, apparently bicolors are delicious. Never had one yet. Wish I knew more about the topic, I’m definitely still a novice on all this. 

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The pores on B. bicolor can sometimes get red, but it's reported as "rarely'".

Not too sure about hybrids.... And I believe B. flammans starts with much redder pores.  

 

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Got it. Yeah you’re right about the pores. The more I get into this the more I wanna learn, this stuff is addicting. Thanks for your help fellas.

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Compare with Boletus roodii https://boletes.wpamushroomclub.org/product/boletus-roodyi/ . This is a red/yellow non-staining species.

Difficult to put my finger on exactly why... but I don't think these are B. bicolor. 

The reddish dots on the pore surface are an unusual feature that I don't know how to explain. There are types of boletes that occur in SE NA that I don't see up here in Pennsylvania. 

Boletus flammans has  a reticulate stalk. 

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3 hours ago, Dave W said:

Compare with Boletus roodii https://boletes.wpamushroomclub.org/product/boletus-roodyi/ . This is a red/yellow non-staining species.

Difficult to put my finger on exactly why... but I don't think these are B. bicolor. 

The reddish dots on the pore surface are an unusual feature that I don't know how to explain. There are types of boletes that occur in SE NA that I don't see up here in Pennsylvania. 

Boletus flammans has  a reticulate stalk. 

I think you nailed it Dave, even the slightly darker yellow holes in the bug canals as that article says. Like you said, those red speckles on the pores... wonder if its to do with the bug interaction?

 

Scratch that, looking at the pics up close, they do look proprietary to the mushroom.

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