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Fr_o_sty

Looking for some help for a novice

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I was out a walk with the dog earlier and I spotted what I think are chanterelle mushrooms? I was hoping someone could 100 percent confirm before I poison myself. Was also hoping someone could help identify the white mushroom as they are in abundance also. Thanks for any help.

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So the yellow ones do appear like chanterelles, do you notice any odor?Typically they smell fruity, almost like apricot. The interior flesh should be solid white. I’m assuming you are on the west coast, might be best to wait for someone else to chime in but I’d say you likely do have chanterelles, though they look maybe a bit old unless you washed them? I just get nervous differentiating true gills vs ridges in photographs. Can’t help with the other mushroom tho.

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I don't know what types of Chanterelles are found in Scotland, but the yellow ones seen here do look like a species of Cantharellus. Internet sources report Cantharellus cibarius from Scotland. One source says the typical apricot odor is occasionally absent in Scottish collections. These look a bit different than the classic Chanterelles I find here in Pennsylvania USA. The stalks are somewhat thinner. Here in NA we have several different species of Yellow Chanterelle. I think it's not unlikely there may be more than one species found in Europe. Ordinarily, I would suggest that spore print color would be helpful. But reports of spore print colors for species of Cantharellus vary... whitish, yellow, pinkish. True Yellow Chanterelles have interior flesh that is white (although if the mushroom is water-soaked some yellow pigment may bleed into the flesh). 

No confident ID proposal for the gray mushroom. Need more info, including better view of the gills ans gill attachment (to the stipe). If you slice through the gills can you detect any liquid on the cut material? 

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Agree with Dave.

The yellow one show all the common morphology of Cantherellus---a species of Chanterelle for sure. Should be yummy.

The brown ones in the outdoors pics are not Chanterelles...I have no idea what they are so would not eat them.

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I don't wish to disparage Dave's proposal of Cantharellus cibarius, which does appear to be a high probability, but there may be another possibility: Hygrophoropsis aurantiaca: https://www.mushroomexpert.com/hygrophoropsis_aurantiaca.html. To me the yellow ones seem to be fairly flimsy and thin capped and not "hard-fleshed...sturdy", as Mushroom Expert describes chanterelles. The stipe seems to be thinner than typical of chanterelles. The ones pictured here do seem to have false gills, indicative of chanterelles, but as brendan suggested, it is can be difficult to differentiate false from true gills in photographs. Fr_o_sty didn't provide any info on habitat, but if found in the same locale as the whiter mushrooms, which are shown with pine cones, the conifer habitat and acid heathland fits the H. aurantiaca species. Were the samples found growing from the ground or on well rotted wood and wood debris?

To narrow down the possibilities, a heavy spore print may be helpful. Although chanterelles may have varied colored spores, including white, the H. aurantiaca will have a white print.

Mushroom Observer doesn't show sightings of H. aurantiaca in Scotland, but iNaturalist has several observations in Scotland: https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/63538-Hygrophoropsis-aurantiaca .

If gathering these samples for the table, try cooking and eating a small amount at first, as H. aurantiaca is listed as edible (but not highly prized, as are chanterelles) by some authors, poisonous by others.

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The yellow ones seen here look more like Cantharellus than Hygrophoropsis to me. But, I admit that I can't rule out the possibility of Hygrophoropsis. As Howard says, obtaining a thick spore print on a white non-absorbent surface would be helpful here. Also, with Cantharellus species the hymenium --layer of material comprising the underside of the cap; gills/false gills-- is composed of the same context as the rest of the cap. The "false gills" are folds/ridges in the cap context. With Hygrophoropsis the hymenium is a composed of a layer of material distinct from the cap context. In some cases the hymenium of Hygrophoropsis can be peeled away from the rest of the cap. 

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