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Rebeca

Nicaragua ID #1

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Hello, I found this in Central America, Nicaragua (San Juan Del Sur), a few days ago (November 2019).   

- About 2km away from the Pacific Ocean.

- On vegetated shaded area.

- Attached to an old dead piece of wood/tree that was on the ground. 

- It's a bit hard (strong) but not brittle.  I can bend it without breaking. 

- Smells like mushrooms from the supermarket.  

Can you help me ID? 

I am working to catalog all mushrooms in the region.  Will share the link once my work is completed. 

Thank you!

Rebeca 

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I think this is either Trametes betulina (formerly Lenzites betulina) http://www.mushroomexpert.com/lenzites_betulina.html, or Daedalea quercina   http://www.mushroomexpert.com/daedalea_quercina.html . In my experience the latter has somewhat thicker/harder flesh and is always found on the wood of oak. T. betulina is often found on birch (as the species name implies), but is known to occur on a variety of types of wood. The strongly zoned color scheme on the cap seen here reminds me more of T. betulina. D. quercina has pores that may look very similar to gills, but the walls are usually thicker than what is seen here. The margin of the underside of D. quercina often features a "rim" where the walls coalesce into a smooth area. 

Daedaelopsis confragosa is somewhat similar, but features a hymenium that is composed of slot-like pores that bruise brownish. Gloephyllum species are brown or reddish-brown, rather than the grayish color seen here.

My guess is this is T. betulina, or perhaps a similar species that is found in tropical/subtropical areas. My experience is based upon northern temperate zones (NE North America). 

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Hi Rebeca, welcome to this site.

I am no expert, especially on Nicaraguan fungi, but this looks like one of the maze pored polypores; possibly Daedaleopsis confragosa. I did not find these located in your country on any of the mushroom observation sites, but iNaturalist: https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/124102-Daedaleopsis-confragosa shows it in adjoining countries. Mushroom Observer https://mushroomobserver.org/207169?q=12LwO  has one maze-like polypore found in Nicaragua.

It would be helpful to have more information to help ID the fungus. A photo showing it in situ is always helpful. Also a cross-section will show separation of the cap and the pore surface. Was it growing singly or did the tree have others nearby? If you rub or scratch the pore surface, does it stain (Daedaleopsis confragosa should stain brown)?

Hope this helps and hope to see you at the forum in the future - this is a great site to meet people with this one common interest and find out about what you find in your locale.

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