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Florida Reishi Mushroom edibility growing on oak

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What do you mean by edibility? You can make tea out of it, if you have a strong stomach. Are any other options?

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Ok I am a little confused here I thought the Reishi was the Ling Chih (Ganoderma Lucidum) if they are one and the same go to your local Chinese market or even restaurant and ask for recipes. I have been looking for this one for many years with zero luck. The one in the picture you took to me looks a little more like the Red Belted Polypore with a sort of white spore print and the Ling Chih has a brown print.

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The polypores seen here are a type of  "Varnished Ganoderma", aka Reishi. "Red Belted Polypore" refers to species of Fomitopsis, and these types grow mainly (exclusively?)  on conifers, usually pine. I don't have a name for the exact species of Ganoderma seen here. In PA I find G. tsugae (on hemlock, rarely on birch), G. curtisii (on maple), and G. sessile (on maple). The ones seen here growing on oak in FL are possibly a different species from the ones I'm familiar with. 

Polypores are sometimes quite stingy giving up spores. You need to harvest at just the right time. But, if you're lucky enough to get a spore print here that's thick enough to determine spore color, then this is useful. 

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23 hours ago, Dave W said:

The polypores seen here are a type of  "Varnished Ganoderma", aka Reishi. "Red Belted Polypore" refers to species of Fomitopsis, and these types grow mainly (exclusively?)  on conifers, usually pine. I don't have a name for the exact species of Ganoderma seen here. In PA I find G. tsugae (on hemlock, rarely on birch), G. curtisii (on maple), and G. sessile (on maple). The ones seen here growing on oak in FL are possibly a different species from the ones I'm familiar with. 

Polypores are sometimes quite stingy giving up spores. You need to harvest at just the right time. But, if you're lucky enough to get a spore print here that's thick enough to determine spore color, then this is useful. 

Re “red belted polypore” I have found them growning on aspens often where I hunt.  I also have never found one with a stipe as shown above.  I concur with Ganoderma ID.

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