Jump to content
Foulhook

ID needed

Recommended Posts

Was hoping these were a honey of some kind? I didn’t harvest them bit I did mark them on GPS. Can anyone give a solid ID? Dave? Old Oak? Come on vets! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a honey. May be something from Hypholoma family. Some Hypholoma  mushrooms (but not all) are edible, but not sizzle skillet yet, wait for others opinions

By the way, in my experience, mushrooms waiting identification will hold longer in a fridge vs nature especially when it is warm outside

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks SVS,

yeah these I had no idea on that’s why I didn’t harvest any. But sure are everywhere up here in the poconos right now. 

Aside from oysters is there anything else to hunt once the cold temps have shown up. Another hard frost overnight last night at about 29 degrees 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm fairly confident these are Hypholoma lateritium (H. sublateritium in many field guides). The similar H. capnoides grows on coniferous wood. I've been seeing both species in abundance here in NE PA these past two weeks. H. fasciculare is a poisonous species that's generally smaller and has greenish gills when young. 

https://mushroomobserver.org/391218?q=10JJ0

https://mushroomobserver.org/391216?q=10JJ0

Beware of the Deadly Galerina   https://mushroomobserver.org/391212?q=10JJ0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Dave W said:

I'm fairly confident these are Hypholoma lateritium (H. sublateritium in many field guides). The similar H. capnoides grows on coniferous wood. I've been seeing both species in abundance here in NE PA these past two weeks. H. fasciculare is a poisonous species that's generally smaller and has greenish gills when young. 

https://mushroomobserver.org/391218?q=10JJ0

https://mushroomobserver.org/391216?q=10JJ0

Beware of the Deadly Galerina   https://mushroomobserver.org/391212?q=10JJ0

Thanks Dave, 

Yep, you guys nailed it. Glad I didn’t bother to cut them. I’ll nust stick to chasing oysters. Anything else worth hunting for this time of Year?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I generally find some Hedgehogs (Hydnum species) this time of year.

Craterellus tubaeformis (Funnel Chanterelle) can often be found in swampy areas under hemlock or pine.

Cantharellula umbonata (Grayling) grows in moss, usually under pine. Can be confused with small Clitocybe mushrooms, some of which are toxic. 

All three of these types are small mushrooms; you need a lot of them to make a meal. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Foulhook said:

Thanks Dave, 

Yep, you guys nailed it. Glad I didn’t bother to cut them. I’ll nust stick to chasing oysters. Anything else worth hunting for this time of Year?  

Don't know but you should have the Sweet Tooth down there it's out right to very late fall maybe into early winter don't know how cold it gets in your  neck of the woods. If you haven't stumbled across one look it up its taste is comparable to chanterelle.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just pan fried some brick caps, H lateritium, yesterday. Decent edible,  might have been the first time I ate them. Easy to clean.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One mushroom you should be able to find in cold weather in your area is Flammulina velutipes, commonly known as Velvet foot or Winter mushroom: https://www.messiah.edu/Oakes/fungi_on_wood/gilled fungi/species pages/Flammulina velutipes.htm These grow throughout the winter, as the common name implies. These are sold commercially as Enotake, Enokitake or Enoki. They are considered a choice, sweet, meaty mushroom, but they, too, are rather small in size. I found these on a rotting willow log in my wood pile last winter. Pictures are during freezing weather and then after a mild thaw; both pics from early January.

1996396764_Flammulina_velutipes_2019-1-1_007.thumb.jpg.1c4be628a3a70ec73223955fa05a6c68.jpg  581140543_Flammulina_velutipes_2019-1-5_003.thumb.jpg.3dc590ceab54c5d70087f99ad02c8a37.jpg

This mushroom has been found in Pa., as evidenced by this post on Mushroom Observer by our friend Dave W.: https://mushroomobserver.org/365866?q=11gqQ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find Flammulina velutipes most often in the spring. It likes to grow on dead elm wood, so I run into to it when looking for morels. But, it can also be found during late fall and in winter if there's a thaw. Good idea to check for white spore print. The deadly Galerina marginata is somewhat similar in appearance and grows at the same times as Velvet Foot. G. marginata has a rusty brown spore print.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Guidelines | We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.