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diana

bolete with pink flesh

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it's been a real sorry year for mushrooms here in the Tampa area but things are suddenly looking up.  Found an assortment since the rains the last few days.  I have been able to identify most of these that have popped up but am stumped over these.  Very round cap, brick red.  Bulbous stem, initially yellow but staining red streaks (no reticulation) when handled,   When cut stem blues/grays and cap flesh instantly stains pink.  Pores very small and tight, dns.  Ammonia seems to have little effect on cap skin but fades the pink staining. Flesh firm with lemony taste, unscented, which is a good thing because I have developed an aversion to the smell of most boletes,

118332014_20191028_085327(2).thumb.jpg.35e9b2632ed7b48895f0d524a258e835.jpg

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Another interesting FL bolete. As usual,  probably a species I don't see up here in PA. If you have a photo of a more mature version, maybe someone could suggest a genus. What kind(s) of tree(s) in the area? 

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Didn't find any mature ones as it is really hit and miss here.  I never find big patches of single varitey mushrooms except for oysters.  Here is a picture of one that is slightly older though may be going to having the fungus.

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The other day I checked mushroom observer and no one had been finding anything similar in Fl recently.  Today I see that something akin is showing up , Pulchroboletus rubicitrius.  Could this be a match?

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Diana, I have doubts about your proposal of Pulchroboletus rubicitrius. That species is said to stain blue when cut. You might take a look at Leccinellum crocipodium, which has the pink staining flesh your photo shows.https://boletes.wpamushroomclub.org/product/leccinellum-crocipodium/ says this is found in Florida.

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I don't have a good handle on the boletes of FL. The trees down in FL are different than the trees up here in PA, and so the types of mycorrhizal fungi tend to be different. But, given the non-blue-staining of the one seen in the latest photo, maybe consider Boletus roodyi?  https://boletes.wpamushroomclub.org/product/boletus-roodyi/

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Howard -  I'll have to check out the leccinellum varities when and if I find any more.  I didn't notice any scabers but sometimes I overlook things.  Also, it is stated that these stain red slowly and the ones I found stained red instantly.  Actually stained so fast I couldn't be sure of the flesh being white or yellow.

Dave - these were found near oaks and hickory, possibly sweetgum.  We have pretty much the same trees as up north...  With exception of the conifers, we do have a few in the pine family but not the beautiful abundance and selection that you guys have.  We do have some palms which I have found support the gilled boletes.  At first I thought this was a freak occurrence but have found this too often to dismiss as an oddity.

Things are really popping here now and I have to be careful to not get overwhelmed.

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That's pretty interesting about the context changing quickly to red. You would think such a distinctive trait would point directly to a specific ID, but I don't know any such example off hand.

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I think I am going to call this one Boletus oliveisporus.  While the discription does not mention the cap flesh turning red the picture on the bolete filter is dead on and further reading does mention a sterile edge which one found today has.  While mushroom expert says that it grows with pine I am certain that the ones I found were with oak.  Found some today and they were with oak also the cap flesh turned red then lost the red quickly.  Mushroom expert does say that they are hard to tell apart from Boletus pulverulentus.  One is edible the other is not.  Not worth the risk to me,  

today's find is below

20191101_165220.thumb.jpg.8ab0db5308ac8dbc78e2ad42c690094a.jpg

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