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Sunny_0ne

Stabs at IDing Yard Mushrooms

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Here are some of the mushrooms I've found in my yard. I've made a stab at IDing them, but the last one has me stumped.

I apologize for the large size of the photos. This is the size I use on my blog and I was too lazy to shrink them. I'll do better next time. :)

I think the little red ones are crimson waxy caps (Hygrocybe punicea)

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I think the next one may be Amanita citrina f citrina. Here are two photos showing top and bottom. The spore print was white.

c1.jpg

c2.jpg

I think the next one is probably a russula. Possibly Russula densifolia? It had a white spore print. I took photos of several. The second photo is a smaller mushroom that was growing up against a larger one. They were growing right by a pine root.

a1.jpg

a3.jpg

And I haven't had any luck identifying this last one. I was unable to get a spore print. As distinctive as it looks, I would think identifying it should be fairly easy, though.

b1.jpg

b2.jpg

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Also, does anyone know what this little cutie is? There were 3 or 4 in the area and they all had that four-corner folded up appearance. (Solid white cap).

post-316-0-17765100-1373330756.jpg

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Red capped mushroom is a species of Hygrocybe. Creamy-white/yellow one with a ring on the stalk is an Amanita. I think maybe Amanita praecox. Low-lying mushroom under the conifer needles is a Russula (I *think*). R. densifola seems like a good proposal to me. Small mushroom with the grooved cap margin is also a Russula... different species from the other Russula. Small white one in the separate post... hmmm. Nothing really registering with me yet. Maybe something related to the genus Lepiota?

Those are real nice photos. Lots of good observable characters. In each case almost the entire mushroom is observable, including the stalk base. Nice job Sunny!

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Thanks, Dave. Glad to see I got close on them!

I don't know what I would do without this forum to bounce my IDs off! :)

As you can see, our drought is gone and we have gotten rain, rain and more rain!

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We had a lot of rain about a week ago. so there's been mushrooms to hunt around here. More rain in the forecast today/tomorrow.

I got an idea about the small white mushroom. It could be a very young Psathyrella, maybe P. delineata. Psathyrellas are dark-spored mushrooms that have gills which turn dark. But a very young specimen may have gills that are almost white.

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Dave, I'll go get a spore print on it today. When I took that picture, I just took it because it was cute. Back later with spore print color report. :)

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Dave, it has a pink (or pinkish) spore print. Here's a look at the cap.

I also found these other little mushroom -- also with pink spore prints. I have been through all my books and all over the web trying to identify them. They may have been growing on buried wood.

I'll do another post with other goodies I found today. :)

post-316-0-68932400-1373416485.jpg

post-316-0-10035500-1373416577.jpg

post-316-0-01897100-1373416593_thumb.jpg

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There's only one Psathyrella I know which has a pink spore print, and it does not look like these. Pink spore print correlates with Entoloma and related genera. But these don't look like any Entolomas I know. Some Rhodocollybia species have pinkish spores. But these don't look like Rhodocollybia to me. So I am stumped!... at least for the moment. Maybe something will occur to me. Nice post! good photos.

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If those little white ones WERE growing on buried wood, they could be a Pluteus. The gills appear to be free.

Regarding the Amanita, the margin appears to be lightly lined? A. citrina should not be lined while A. praecox should be. However, A. praecox doesn't have a partial veil and so shouldn't have a nice ring on the stem (although you often get bits of the outer veil clinging to the stalk).

I would hazard a guess that it is one of these two, but I don't know which. The cap colour seems to be closer to A. praecox.

Maybe A. russuloides?

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Thanks, Dave. I really appreciate your help. It is so far above and beyond the call of duty.

It's not critical that I ID them. It's just like trying to solve a puzzle. There are lots more to puzzle over!

The following little white puffballs appear in my yard every year. They have a tough, leathery rind, which at first led me to believe they were Scleroderma. However, the spore mass is greenish brown, so I don't think they are scleroderma.

I have tentatively identified them as Lycoperdon marginata, but I am not satisfied with my ID. :)

small-inedible-puffball-sm.jpg


small-puffballs3.jpg

I didn't find many references to the next puffball. It was larger (maybe 2-1/2 - 3") and was on the ground near the little white puffballs.

It's looks to me like what Roody describes as a Lycoperdon americanum.

spiny-puffball-sm.jpg

spiny-puffball3-sm.jpg

It's thunderstorming outside again, so I'll give you a break! :)

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I agree with you about the puffball ID, Sunny. Here's one of my own recent finds.

http://mushroomobserver.org/139040?q=1MQQY

I checked up on Russula densifola. I think your russula is different. The ones that have a red staining stage tend to stain unmistakably red for at least several minutes. I would consider R. compactica for this one.

Calvert, A. citrina types sometime devlop faint groves along the cap margin, but not so distinctly as the ones seen in these photos. Also, the basal structure on the one seen here appears to show the "rolled sock" appearance associated with most of the pantheroid types. According to the Amanita Studies website, A. praecox marginal striations are fairly short (20%-25% of cap radius).

http://www.amanitaceae.org/?Amanita+praecox

Still stuck on those pink-spored white ones!

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Dave, how cool that you are finding the same things in your Pennsylvania yard that I am finding in NW Georgia!

Also, thanks for the lead on Russula densifolia. I didn't think to smell my specimen. But I noticed another big one under the pines today, so I will check the odor tomorrow. Also, I have not seen a white stage. They are always tan when I find them. So that would cast more doubt on my ID.

I was not too crazy about Kuo's book 100 Edible Mushrooms, but his website is like an encyclopedia. I visit it often when I am trying to id things.

Don't worry about the pink spored mushrooms. I am waiting for a bolete to come up that reappears every year. It is very distinctive with a red velvety cap that turns brown, yellow stalk and the most beautiful, unusual indentations in the stalk. No one has been able to identify it for me. I'll try here when it comes back this year.

I think you will love it!

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I agree with you about the puffball ID, Sunny. Here's one of my own recent finds.

http://mushroomobserver.org/139040?q=1MQQY

I checked up on Russula densifola. I think your russula is different. The ones that have a red staining stage tend to stain unmistakably red for at least several minutes. I would consider R. compactica for this one.

Calvert, A. citrina types sometime devlop faint groves along the cap margin, but not so distinctly as the ones seen in these photos. Also, the basal structure on the one seen here appears to show the "rolled sock" appearance associated with most of the pantheroid types. According to the Amanita Studies website, A. praecox marginal striations are fairly short (20%-25% of cap radius).

http://www.amanitaceae.org/?Amanita+praecox

Still stuck on those pink-spored white ones!

You're right Dave that the base looks much more like A. Praecox. The Amanita Studies website says you can have the "limbus internus", (which I'm not sure is the actual partial veil or part of the volva), make a ring-like formation on the stem. Here are some other pictures of A. praecox with a ring such as Sunny_One found:

http://www.mycoquebec.org/bas.php?trie=A&l=l&nom=Amanita%20praecox%20Y.%20Lamoureux%20nom.%20prov.%20/%20Amanite%20pr%C3%A9coce&tag=Amanita%20praecox&gro=%2013

The white one is a mystery, and likely will remain so. I forgot to check in my books while at home yesterday. Question: Was the spore print really "Pink" as in flesh coloured? Or was it more white,just tinged with pink? Colours are hard to describe with words!

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I checked up on Russula densifola. I think your russula is different.

The ones that have a red staining stage tend to stain unmistakably red

for at least several minutes. I would consider R. compactica for this

one.

Dave, you were right. I checked this morning, and that mushroom stinks!!! So R. compactica it is!

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