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eat-bolete

Blushing Amanita help

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I think I’ll brave up ant try a blusher this year. So, before I start finding them, I wanted to see if I’m on the right track. I understand more details needed to solidly ID blushers but I only have these photos from previous years for now. Do you see anything on these photos that makes you doubt it’s a blusher? If so, which species would you check? Especially the 1st photo with a clump of Amanitas, I see the base is more pronounced as if there is volva, what do you think?

 

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Often I see these in the summer. Your photos look like them. A good source of info is Amanitaceae.org. It list it in in the section Validae under amerirubescence, the Eastern American Blusher. I often casually ID them never thinking of eating them but I see it listed as a good edible at Mycoquebec.  I'm sure Dave will have something to say about this. Saw 2 different Amanitas so far this year. When I see these I'll post them.

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I tried eating Blushing Amanitas a few times (many years ago). Once I thought the flavor was good and once I thought not so good. In NA, the blushers comprise a complex of related species. In some places (possibly only one of) these types are popular edibles. I have herd that blushers need to be well-cooked to remove a toxin. The related "Yellow Blusher", A. flavorubens, is suspected to be toxic. 

The A. rubescens types don't show a lot of volval structure on the stipe bases. Most of the universal veil is deposited on the cap. The mushrooms pictured all look to represent the (ameri)rubescens concept. Look at the diverse appearances seen in the 43 photos here https://www.mycoquebec.org/bas.php?trie=A&l=l&nom=Amanita amerirubescens Tulloss nom. prov. / Amanite rougissante&tag=Amanita amerirubescens&gro=13 . 

The only ones that makes me wonder a bit are seen in the first photo. The stipes are a bit shaggy and the uv warts on the caps are particularly well-developed. Compare with Amanita canescens. 

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Thanks Dave and bobby.

I see they vary a bit in appearance, I’ll be looking for speciment exhibiting all matching characteristics such as non-white specks on the cap, annulus with striations, absence of distinct volva, staining of flesh inside and out, absense of unpleasant smell, adnexed gills.

Will post to confirm before consuming. Cooking will include parboiling and then frying. Tiny amount of course.

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This looks like A amerirubescens. The stem enlarged toward the base without veil remnants. It had some reddish staining in the stem. It was in oaks at north park. Yesterday. amerirubescens?

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I think so, bobby. Another trait to note is that in most cases the amerirubescens types have non-striate cap margin, as is seen in your specimen and in each of eat-bolete's photos. 

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Nice! I recently checked my parks, nothing except M. rodmanii and sporadic P. cervinus yet.

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