Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Found growing in decaying weeds and wood chips in Southern California.

convex cap brown/gold (wavy when mature), adnate gills grey/tan (dark brown when dried out/mature), 3-4mm white stem (hollow)

76F0535E-D37D-4E50-859E-A10D582CF762.jpeg

F0A89088-8946-4BC7-90F5-FA99DE4E76C7.jpeg

BA4C896F-2E03-4A19-85CB-364853C144AD.jpeg

BC70C03D-DA3A-4492-B4D7-99FDEEB668EC.jpeg

4BBF8D6A-C5B0-48DF-801E-35427AA4E65A.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One possibility for at least some of these may be Agrocybe putaminum. But one feature that's a bit off for this species in the very dark mature gills. Another possibility is Leratiomyces riparius. Spore print color may be useful here. You would need a thick print in order to distinguish between Agrocybe (dark cigar-brown) and Leratiomyces (purple brown). Also, an immature Leratiomyces mushroom will feature a partial veil covering the gills. Some species of Agrocybe also have partial veils; except A. putaminum does not. California Fungi says Leratiomyces riparius has a hollow stem when mature  http://www.mykoweb.com/CAF/species/Leratiomyces_riparius.html  . 

There are other possibilities. In particular --although I don't think these mushrooms really fit the profile-- Hebeloma mushrooms are quite poisonous. Also, there may be more than one species represented in these photos. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The print color should be darker for genus Leratiomyces. Also seems kinda on the light side for Agrocybe. Which mushroom pictured was used to obtain the spore print? Also, it looks like the print in the photo is on glass, and a beam of light is directed onto it. I believe I see a shadow being cast onto a surface by the print... beneath what I think is the piece of glass.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Dave W said:

The print color should be darker for genus Leratiomyces. Also seems kinda on the light side for Agrocybe. Which mushroom pictured was used to obtain the spore print? Also, it looks like the print in the photo is on glass, and a beam of light is directed onto it. I believe I see a shadow being cast onto a surface by the print... beneath what I think is the piece of glass.  

Thanks Dave,

 

So the print came from one of the smaller caps in the second picture on the original post. The print was done on a glass desktop. Since I have yellow lighting in the room which made the picture almost impossible to see, I used a bright white flashlight to get the photo to turn out. The texture underneath is just the texture of the glass. The picture does it the best "justice" possible in terms of translating the actual color seen into a photograph with the limitations of my "equipment". 

I'd be happy to go collect another sample and do another print on paper. The tree is in my back yard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Photos taken outdoors --but not in direct sunlight-- tend to convey colors most accurately. Photos taken using indoor lighting tend to inaccurately portray color. I usually look for a spot outside that's shaded but very close to an open sunny area. The shade reduces glare and the nearby well-lit area provides ambienit light. If it's cloudy, an area in the open may work well. It's often useful to experiment with different outdoor lighting scenarios, as well as a variety of different perspectives. 

I suspect the spore print seen in the photos is reflecting some light which makes it appear to be less dark than in reality. But, this may be incorrect. There appears to be a slight purplish tinge to the print. 

The first photo (top) looks like Hebeloma. But, the gills seen in subsequent photos look to be too dark for Hebeloma. Also, a few of the caps appear to feature small scales on the surface. This is also something I would not expect for Hebeloma.  Another thought that comes to mind is genus Psathyrella. Most mushrooms in this genus have very dark spore print, with a few exceptions that feature pinkish spore prints similar to the one seen here. The mushrooms seen in the 4th photo down do look some what like Psathyrella. Psathyrella mushrooms are fairly fragile; they break apart easily. Assuming the spore print is actually darker than what appears in the photos, my guess is Leratiomyces; but I don't have much confidence in this proposal.

Use of a microscope may be necessary here. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Dave W said:

Photos taken outdoors --but not in direct sunlight-- tend to convey colors most accurately. Photos taken using indoor lighting tend to inaccurately portray color. I usually look for a spot outside that's shaded but very close to an open sunny area. The shade reduces glare and the nearby well-lit area provides ambienit light. If it's cloudy, an area in the open may work well. It's often useful to experiment with different outdoor lighting scenarios, as well as a variety of different perspectives. 

I suspect the spore print seen in the photos is reflecting some light which makes it appear to be less dark than in reality. But, this may be incorrect. There appears to be a slight purplish tinge to the print. 

The first photo (top) looks like Hebeloma. But, the gills seen in subsequent photos look to be too dark for Hebeloma. Also, a few of the caps appear to feature small scales on the surface. This is also something I would not expect for Hebeloma.  Another thought that comes to mind is genus Psathyrella. Most mushrooms in this genus have very dark spore print, with a few exceptions that feature pinkish spore prints similar to the one seen here. The mushrooms seen in the 4th photo down do look some what like Psathyrella. Psathyrella mushrooms are fairly fragile; they break apart easily. Assuming the spore print is actually darker than what appears in the photos, my guess is Leratiomyces; but I don't have much confidence in this proposal.

Use of a microscope may be necessary here. 

I did another spore print. This time I am using natural lighting, and have included the actual cap from which the print was taken in the picture. In the "before" picture you can clearly see the yellow hue my interior lighting created. The print definitely has a slight purple to it.

I would be highly interested in finding someone with a microscope - how fancy of a microscope would I need? or will one from a high school chemistry class be sufficient?

IMG_1757.jpg

IMG_1752.jpg

IMG_1748.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This latest spore print looks more like what I'd expect from a species of Leratiomyces. The previous photos of the lighter spore print likely represent a species of either Hebeloma or Psathyrella. Looks like you've got at least two different species growing in those wood chips. 

You can get a lot of good info from a scope that magnifies to 400x. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...