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we been finding a lot of different looking honeys. I wonder what does a real honey look like. Please help.

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Those are honeys alright. Mushroom Dan, those are real honeys in your picture and they can range in color just like the ones in your photos. Cap color is not a great indicator for them. The other physical characteristics will paint a much clearer picture.

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Researcher Tom Volk has identified something like 17 different species of Armillaria that occur in NA. Here in NE PA i gather maybe 4 or 5 different species of "Honeys". And, within a single species concept, the cap color may vary. What I see in the photos are all Honeys.

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Not been many honey mushrooms here in Northern Allegheny County this year but this year I did see ringless for the first time.  

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So not many Armillaria in SW PA...? Here in NE PA it's been the best year in memory. 

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Fall temps have been very late to arrive here in Virginia. Just yesterday was the first day we have had with highs in the 60s. I'm hoping for some A.mellea this week...only very small clusters to date. Yesterday I found an extremely small cluster A. tabescens. 

Dave, if you guys are finding large numbers in PA then I don't think we will be long.

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Went out yesterday and saw a lot of honeys. Almost all were past. 

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No honeys for me this year. Our first frost never stopped. We went from 60 F to 30 F overnight and it stayed that way until heavy snow arrived a couple days later

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haha, I havent found any honeys  either but the temps in MN did a similar plummet from nearly 80 to scarcely 40 in about 2 weeks.  Up until then there were copious shrooms of all types. I doubt we'll see 60 again...

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10 hours ago, clamp connection said:

haha, I havent found any honeys  either but the temps in MN did a similar plummet from nearly 80 to scarcely 40 in about 2 weeks.  Up until then there were copious shrooms of all types. I doubt we'll see 60 again...

You probably had the very wet summer like we did with copious amounts of summer/early fall mushrooms. I picked bushels of hedgehogs and agaricus mushrooms this year, My Dad who cottages near the Minnesota border on Lake of the Woods picked a bunch of honeys about 3 weeks ago. You may have missed the season if you are in Northern Minnesota.

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Yes it was wet,wet, wet! I know someone else who found honeys in my area, but he only found a handful. In my case I was looking but I'm not that familiar with them.  He is. But otherwise this seemed like a record year for abundance and diversity. I did see a lot of Agaricus and picked a huge bowl of them. I saw many shrooms I've never seen before.  Too bad its over.

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27 minutes ago, clamp connection said:

Yes it was wet,wet, wet! I know someone else who found honeys in my area, but he only found a handful. In my case I was looking but I'm not that familiar with them.  He is. But otherwise this seemed like a record year for abundance and diversity. I did see a lot of Agaricus and picked a huge bowl of them. I saw many shrooms I've never seen before.  Too bad its over.

With honeys it's about finding a good patch of dead poplars or other hardwood trees. You'll find them there. I know lots of guys go into healthy woods looking for them that have a dead tree or two, but I find the most success when you have big stands of dead poplar in one area.  Once you find an area you usually have a few years of good picking.

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The honeys in the backyard finally popped this week on a large dead old oak (pre civil war sprouting). Usually they are scattered about the various oak trees but so far only on the one.

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Both very real, both tasted great:)

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That's the best looking honey pic I have seen this year EB. Prime buttons. 

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I'm guessing the yellow ones are A. mellea and the brown ones A. gallica. Both clusters look to be in perfect harvesting condition. I got quite a few nice ones like this. Armillaria season is likely drawing to a close here in NE PA. 

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Thanks Matt!

Yep, mellea and gallica indeed. Our honey season was short, everything grew in all spots all at ones, but I was lucky enough to get enough free time to get to most of them in time.

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This year has been weird . We went from Summer right straight into fall in what seemed like two days. I found my first handful of A.mellea today that was big enough to pick along with a few hedgehogs. All the trees that have had huge flushes in the past are turning up absolutely nothing. My work schedule the way it's looking will probably make me miss anything that will flush in the next few days. So just like that the Honeys are probably over for me but that's life.

 

 A. gallica is a seldom seen honey for me so far. I have only found it on one tree and it has not flushed this year. We make up for it with A. Tabescens though.

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Quite opposite for me. I see tabescens, but quite rarely and never a big flush. Maybe I haven’t found the right spots yet though :)

We had nice early fall, temps were in low 70s for quite a while but then suddenly dropped into 40s and low 50s, which prevented normal Leccinum appearance and even Suillus are almost non-existent, just a bunch of corts around.

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We get our leccinums and suillus up here in mid summer (late July, early August). A. Tabescens in early September, and unfortunately A. Mellea and Gallica in mid September and only if we don't go below 0 in that time. We don't have a fall to speak of, one day you are in a t-shirt and shorts the next day there is snow on the ground. lol. Some traditional late fall species have adapted up here and are in early spring,

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Wow thanks for all the great info guys. This looks like an expert family to collect. Too advanced so we will hold off. I heard there are poisonous look alikes PLUS not all people can tolerate Armillaria. Are there any species that have no bad cases against them?

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The only popular wild types that seem to bother almost nobody --if cooked-- are Chanterelles (Cantharellus species), Black Trumpets, and King Boletes (B. edulis and a few other related species). Lots of people in my area eat Grifola (Hen of the Woods, Sheep's Head, Maitake). The biggest problem with this mushroom seems to be that some people eat too much of it, and get indigestion. Although, someone told me just last week that he prepared some soup using Grifola and a family member became nauseous after consuming only one modest serving. 

 

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Another safe (and delicious) species is Hydnum repandum, the Hedgehog Mushroom.  It is even safer than Chanterelles; I can't think of anything else that even resembles it.

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I meant, are there Armillaria species that are more safer than other Armillaria species?

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Not sure about the answer to that question, Dan. I've never had any problem that I have eaten, and these entail 3 or 4 different species. I always parboil Armillaria before freezing or preparing in a meal. 

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