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MushroomDan

Blewits?

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Blewits are now growing in the leaf pile litter in my area.  I've eaten them before but I'm liking them this year.

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Dave, what types of conifers do you prefer for Blewits? 

4 hours ago, Dave W said:

I've been getting Blewits under conifers. 

 

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I’m curious too. I heard they grow under eastern hemlock but would like to confirm. Really like them but can never find more than 2-3

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From what I've found and read, I think that Blewits are saprobic; and, as such are not associated with any particular trees.  However, the ones that I've found have been associated with rotting conifer needles, sometimes naturally falling ones and, other times, dumps of needle debris.  The most dense group that I've seen, only about a dozen, was growing on a tiny pile (maybe a foot in diameter) of various conifer needles that had been raked up in a nearby yard and dumped in an adjacent power line clearing.

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I found a large patch in early September (that's blewit season up here) around big mature spruce mixed with some jack pine on hard pack trail through caribou moss.

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hmmm, carpets of needles around, but no blewits...however no jack pine or spruce around here, maybe that’s why.

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At my house they grow under the Norway Spruce (in the needles and moss) and in the piles of hardwood leafs. Saprobic,  but they probably have their organic preference.

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13 hours ago, eat-bolete said:

hmmm, carpets of needles around, but no blewits...however no jack pine or spruce around here, maybe that’s why.

I think that they are pretty widespread. Up here in the boreal forest that is their preference, it could be very different in your neck of the woods. They go with what's best in a particular ecosystem imo.

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Most often spruce, but also pine and even infrequently hemlock. Lepista is a genus of saprobes. They tend to appear in the same spots for maybe a few years --until the nutrients are used up-- and then show up someplace else. Some years more in hardwood areas. Occasionally in grassy areas, and frequently on last year's leaf litter that's piled up. 

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Mostly loblolly pine in my area, I do have great variety of hard woods though.The blewits have been a hard one for me to zero in on.

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now that I’m thinking where I found them previously, pile of leaves makes lots of sense. Gotta go make some piles now for next year.

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10 minutes ago, eat-bolete said:

Gotta go make some piles now for next year.

Haha....my wife would love to use this one against me for getting the leaves up in the yard.

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Oh, right... I almost forgot about the leaves. Still too many on the maples next to my house. Raking/piling in on the horizon. 

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The spore print from the ones that I posted a picture of was light tan/buff.  I really dont have much in the way of pines around. A few red pines, but these are pretty numerous in my leaf pile and, as mentioned, in the rhubarb leaf mulch.

They are getting pretty big now, but I cant appreciate much "blue" in them,  more tan.

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20 hours ago, Peter G Janssen said:

The spore print from the ones that I posted a picture of was light tan/buff.  I really dont have much in the way of pines around. A few red pines, but these are pretty numerous in my leaf pile and, as mentioned, in the rhubarb leaf mulch.

They are getting pretty big now, but I cant appreciate much "blue" in them,  more tan.

It will be more of a violet than blue in my experience. They tend to become tan in age on top but usually have some purple tones on the gills. If they started out more purple than they could possibly be blewits. Do you have pics of the spore print?

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