Jump to content
EatTheWeeds

Austroboletus Gracilis

Recommended Posts

Found these yesterday. There were conifer trees in the same forested area, however none near these guys.  The caps were extremely spongy.  Some of them stained brown as can be seen, and others (not pictured) looked identical, but stained a dark purple-brown.  After taking the photos, I realized that the smaller one shown might not be the same species, but it was growing with them.  The system were fibrous.

What could they be?

IMG_20180906_125939957.jpg

IMG_20180906_125753038_HDR.jpg

IMG_20180906_125924178.jpg

IMG_20180906_125816205_HDR.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Austroboletus gracilis  makes sense to me (including the smaller one). I usually find this species under hemlock, but Boletes of Eastern North America says it also occurs under "broadleaf trees". Spore print should be pinkish brown (which is why this species had previously been placed in genus Tylopilus). The caps of this type are usually composed of mostly the tubes, so the consistency is spongy. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dave.  Maybe I should've done more research before posting, or perhaps I've done too much research now!  I was looking, and the cap and description began to resemble Tylopilus indecisus to me...  Maybe I'm over thinking this because nearby, I also found a bunch of what I'm guessing are tylopilus rubrobrunneus?  I'll post photos of these in a minute...  the trees both were directly under were mainly oak.

I went back and gathered more of both mushrooms...  The pores on these pull away from the cap very easily.  Gonna try to get a spore print next.

IMG_20180907_131208571.jpg

IMG_20180907_131220570.jpg

IMG_20180907_132045162_HDR.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting. I think the one with the thick stalk (group photo) is different than the others. And, the thinner ones are on the pale side for A. gracilis (although color varies somewhat for this species). The thick one is very likely a species of Tylopilus, maybe indecisus, although the cap is kinda pale. The brown-capped Tylopilus species are apt to fade in age. 

So, not a great deal of confidence overall. In the original photos, the small maroom one is very likely A. gracilis. The larger ones are probably A. gracilis. The thick-stalked one i the last set of photos... Tylopilus species. Did you taste the thick-stalked one? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...