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kvgunten

Unknown mushroom in a wetland, likely part of a fairy ring

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Hello!

I am new here in this forum, thanks for any help in advance!

I am working in a forest near Timmins in Ontario, Canada. It is a fairly wet soil, rich in peat and overgrown with black spruce and tamarack. I found a mushroom here (see pictures) and I am not sure what it might be. It seems to grow along a ring (fairy ring?), however this is not quite clear in this terrain.

Not interested to eat it, just very curious what it might be.

Thanks,

Konstantin

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Looks to be a bit on the old side. Spore print color would likely help here. Any noticeable odor? 

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Thanks for the reply! Spores do not leave any visible coloration. The smell is not particularly special. Typical mushroom smell. I can see if I can get a photo of a younger one.

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I *think* this may be a species of Hypholoma. There are basically two subgroups comprising this genus, the ones that grow on dead wood and the ones that grow in mossy wetlands. This may be one of the moss/wetland species. Maybe something like H. radicosum. But, the scaly cap surface --seen on the pics above-- is not something that fits well with the moss Hypholoma species. The moss-inhabiting Hypholoma species mainly have stalks that root deeply in the moss and cap diameters significantly smaller than the length of the stalk. 

If you get a spore print color, this would likely help. If my proposal is correct, spore print should be dark... brown, purple-brown. 

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Thank you Dave for this information and the ideas!

I will see if I can find a specimen that gives away spores.

Thank you Dave for this information and the ideas!

I will see if I can find a specimen that gives away spores.

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Unfortunately, I did not have time to return to the place and check more features of the samples.

However, in the meantime, I had some DNA work done on some of the specimens for a study and it turns out I was totally wrong telling all of the mushrooms above of being the same species.

The first 5 pictures I uploaded are most likely Cortinarius helvelloides. Also picture 6 shows the same mushroom from the top.

Not sure what 7 and 8 are (no analysis).

Picture 9 to 12 are likely an Inocybe species. I get good agreement with Inocybe lacera.

Thanks!

 

 

 

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Nice work! I just did a quick check of Cortinarius helvelloides on Champignons du Quebec. Photos do indeed look like what you have in the first few photos. I would not have guessed Cortinarius for this one. Interesting species.

Last few photos do look like an Inocybe. Growing in deep moss seems like an unusual habitat for Inocybe. If you have access to a microscope that provides 400x magnification, you may be able to confirm Inocybe. Many inocybe species feature prominent hymenial cystidia with encrusted apices. These tend to look like bowling pins with crowns. Some Inocybe species feature stellate or nodulose spores. 

7/8 may be a species of Lactarius. The one cap appears to feature a small pointed umbo. Need more info.

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