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jonkotowski

" In fact, there are no known poisonous polypores!"...?

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I found this excerpt while trying to positively identify some ganoderma. Here is the link to the page http://www.mushroom-...tification.html

Is this true? it said " Fortunately, there are no poisonous reishi look-alikes. In fact, there are no known poisonous polypores! So hunting for reishi is pretty safe."

Does this apply to all polypores?

Follow up question- These mushroom pictured in this post are safe ganoderma ... right?

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Yes. What kind of trees did you find these on or with? Oak? Just because there may not be poisonous polypores, doesn't make them all safe to eat. Especially for those taking MAO inhibitors, they should not eat polypores and that includes Maitake or hen of the woods.

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The one exception to this "rule" that I know of is chicken of the woods, various Laetiporus species (orange bands

on top, white or bright yellow pores). They have been known to produce gastronomic upset in some people,

which you can classify as a mild poisoning.

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The one exception to this "rule" that I know of is chicken of the woods, various Laetiporus species (orange bands

on top, white or bright yellow pores). They have been known to produce gastronomic upset in some people,

which you can classify as a mild poisoning.

Some people also report difficulty digesting Grifola, Hen of the Woods.

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Indeed, Hapalopilus nidulans --and perhaps others-- is known to be poisonous. This species features fairly soft-fleshed polypores, so it's conceivable someone may try eating it. Should be mentioned in any discussion about consuming polypores, or the teas/tinctures. (Unlikely to be confused with any Ganoderma species.) 

Just now noticed ladyflyfish's recommendation that anyone taking MAO inhibitors should refrain from polypore consumption. 

Thanks for bumping this discussion up to the top, Rondayvous.

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Thankfully MAO inhibitors are almost never used anymore (way worse interactions with other drugs than whatever happens with poly pores I’d imagine). They’ve been largely replaced by newer drugs. You may run into it with an older person whose still on them just because they’re used to it and it’s worked for a long time. Just FYI. 

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