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We had just a bit of rain (about 1/8in) on Saturday then these popped up.  While I am sure that they are honey mushrooms I am concerned with it not being the season.  I thought the honeys were a fall mushroom.  Went to mushroom observer to see if anyone else in Florida was seeing these but no luck.  There are about ten patches on roots and stumps.  I do realize that Florida is sometimes a weirdo.  

With this being our normally dry season I am happy to report that we did also have 2 inches of rain over the last several days so I am eager to hit the woods and see what else may be popping up :D

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Diana, for some reason I am unable to view your photos. Instead of pics, there's just a lot of code.

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Sorry, shows up for me but I'll upload another way.

 

 

0409181709b_HDR.jpg

0409181709_HDR.jpg

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Okay, thanks Diana. Photos are now seen. Looks like Armillaria tabescens to me. I have seen other reports of early season A. tabescens from areas of SE NA, but not quite this early. However, mushroom seasons in FL are markedly different from what is expected further north. There a few available field guides specific to SE NA. I don't own any of these. I'm pretty sure that both the Bessettes and Bill Roody are very familiar with the mushrooms of FL. Do you have their SE NA field guide? If so, I'd be interested in seeing what they have to say about the fruiting season for A. tabescens. I assume you have observed a white spore print for these. 

There's a new genus for tabescens... Desarmillaria. Here's the MO section for observations of Desarmillaria tabescens  http://mushroomobserver.org/observer/observation_search?page=1&pattern=Desarmillaria+tabescens.  There's three pages of observations and some of them are from March/April. Here's an example from Texas  http://mushroomobserver.org/274016?q=J6XU . Note that the ID proposal was made by Walt Sturgeon, a highly respected identifier of eastern NA mushrooms.  Walt submitted his ID proposal at a modest level of confidence ("Could Be"), indicating that he was surprised by an occurrence of this species in early spring . 

Should be interesting getting into the woods after all that rain. 

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I’ve actually found honeys during early season chanterelle scouting. If I remember right it was mid April of last year. They were growing at the base of an White Oak. They were pretty old so I hadn’t documented them and posted. Won’t be visiting that area or picking there this year or any other year. Completely bulldozed for a roundabout ☹️😩 Was my best chanty patch 

In south Louisiana if you didn’t know that already Diana

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Dave - yes, white spore print.  I did purchase the SE north amer. guide.  I was anxious to get it and got it via google books.  Big mistake, would have preferred something I could thumb through at leisure.  Since it is only accessed via the internet I find it a bit cumbersome to use and end up forgetting about it entirely.   I'll have to check it.

I went to check out the info on the newly named variety and am totally confused.  What's the difference between these and the other?  btw, mine were found on oak roots and a sweet gum stump and roots.

Troutaddicted - Yes, for fall but seemed a couple weeks after everyone else was finding.  By "fall" I mean as the calendar says not the weather.  Was still in the upper 90's at the time.  Which brings me to another thought.  Are mushroom "seasons" based on temperatures or day length?  Or, maybe a combo?

CajunShroomer35 - Sorry about your loss.  I understand.  They are putting a housing development on my favorite berry patch.  Yay for progress :angry:

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Desarmillaria tabescens is the new name for Armillaria tabescens. Apparently, DNA analysis has placed this species onto a branch of the phylogenetic tree that does not include species from genus Armillaria. What this means is, if you want to consult a source like Mushroom Observer to see "Ringless Honey Mushroom" observations then you need to use the current name, Desarmillaria tabescens. Sometimes it takes awhile before a new genus or species name shows up in the field guides. I've seen examples on Mushroom Observer where a given species gets kicked back and forth between two different genera.

Fungal taxonomy is currently in a state of --occasionally fickle-- flux. Consider the species currently named Oudemansiella furfuracea (Rooting Collybia). The Audubon guide lists this mushroom as Oudemansiella radicata and mentions that a former name is Collybia radicata. After publication of Audubon, genus Xerula was erected and the name was changed to Xerula furfuracea. (In NA, the European species concept "radicata" does not apply, and subsequent research resulted in splitting the NA concept into several similar taxa.) A few years ago the genus Hymenopellis was erected to house the "Rooters", after which this mushroom was Hymenopellis furfuracea for awhile. Then, molecular data suggested that the species actually belonged in genus Oudemansiella... where it had been in the Audubon... except under a different species name. I *think* this historical perspective is at least close to being accurate. 

Finding this type mushroom when the temperatures are peaking in the high 90s seems --to me-- even weirder than finding them now! What sorts of nighttime lows are typical when the fall versions are found?

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Okay, I think I get it.  So, what you are saying is that I wont be able to find info using old name in someplace like Mushroom Obs. where everyone is up to date on these name changes.  And nothing really has changed but the name and classification but for me and my use of the mushroom..... same old - same old.  :lol:

 

I did go back and check the weather for my area during last fall and the abundant ringless honeys.  First week of October was peak.  Temps were highs at or around 90 and lows were mid- 70s.

I have this ongoing argument with my husband.  This winter when mushroom hunting was turning up empty he was claiming that it was too cold.  Well heck, I was trying to explain to him that some were finding mushrooms under snow and that up in the mountains where a lot of you search even summer temps were as low as our coldest week!  (we had one week of sweater weather with the lows dipping to 32 for several hours but no "real" freeze)  This past week we have experienced a cold front with the lows dipping into the high 50s.  Actually one night we hit 58 and that was the night we turned off the AC and opened windows.  Expecting one night this coming week of no AC and that's it for cool weather.  Normally our no AC at night is  the beginning of October through end of April which means 60 or below for a low for me but the last 5 or so years it's been much warmer.  I know, I know, too much info.  But, I guess what I'm trying to say is I may have been exaggerating the temps on my previous post. 

But... I did find mushrooms pretty consistently from June on till November last year.  This was my first year of actual hunting/identifying and that started in June.  And it was a hot miserable summer.  That is why I believe that it's not the temperature so much as the length of day.  Here we have longer days in the winter than you guys.  It evens out because you northerners have longer days than us in the summer.  For instance, our chickens lay year round but total output is about equal.  I'm talking yardbirds not egg factories with artificial light.

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Length of day may be a factor, as this affects how much solar energy is available. Also, in an area like FL where there isn't any actual ground-freezing temps, times of year when mushrooms flush may be more-or-less a function of mycelium/fruit-body growth cycles that are at least similar from year to year. But, I think the idea of it getting too cold in your area has merit. It may be that fungal species in FL are not adapted to sub-40 degree temps. I'm guessing that some of the typical cold weather species I find up here in PA are absent in FL. For example, species of Hygrophorus (especially the slimy-capped ones), species of Tricholoma, Hericium. Do you get Blewits (Lepista/Clitocybe nuda) down your way? 

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Perhaps its a function of ideal growing temps.  Spring and Fall are similar, warm days vs. Cold nights.  Here in the north, as temps  start to cool in late Summer and the rains start we go out for honeys.  Though I havent found honeys in the Spring, perhaps the Floridian/Louisianan Spring fluctuations allow for the flush of honeys ( although abundance may be low ).  I suspect that even though honeys are tolerant of -40's, they lay dormant during Spring and only get a chance in the Fall.  

We see something similar in our fish sometimes, the implanted chinook salmon in Lake Ontario - a Fall river spawning species - has been caught during our Spring trout runs because the conditions of river are exactly that of the Fall - dumb fish, dumb mushrooms?  Either way they taste good.

Whoops, just realised I echoed Daves previous statement

Bah - merged my posts together, I realised late that we are both saying the same thing.  Either way your pics show some fantastic, bug free specimens!  

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Cajun and I both found them last June he in La and me in VA about a week apart if my memory is correct. I was totally confused at the time thinking I was possibly missing something so I posted them here.

The same trees flushed again in the fall so I'm curious to see if they flush again this spring or summer. 

Good eye Diana

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