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Pleurotus ??


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Are these Pleurotus??

Growing on a live willow tree. The oysters I usually find in this area do not have stems like the ones pictured. May not even be a Pleurotus species. Spore printing in the process. I'll post tomorrow morning. All mushrooms were growing on the same tree within 5-6 feet from one another. Smallest one is 2 inches across, biggest one was 6-7 inches across. 

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My first impression was Hypsizygus. . http://www.mushroomexpert.com/hypsizygus_ulmarius.html    But then I noticed the material hanging from the cap margin (2nd photo). Neither Hypsizygus ulmaria nor H. marmoreus has partial veil. The gill edges appear to be slightly ragged, so Lentinus/Neolentinus comes to mind. But these types grow on dead wood. 

Pleurotus dryinus is a good proposal, except this species is reported as having a fuzzy/scaly stalk.

I don't think these are Pholiota; gills are just too white. But taking a spore print is a good idea, just in case these are young dark-spored mushrooms with pale immature gills. 

Interesting find.

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Dave I think you have it narrowed down to Hypsizygus. That one with partial veil was the only one in the colony that had that on it. Not sure what to think of it. After some more research on the web I haven't found anything closely related. The more mature specimens were all enlarged at the base as Mushroom Expert says 

 

 

After reading this on mushroom expert, not sure what to think. I collected quite a few, off one branch in hopes it was in the Pleurotus family. 

"Hypsizygus ulmarius, sometimes called the "elm oyster," is edible, but in my opinion not nearly so palatable as the Pleurotus group. It is somewhat tougher and not likely to occur in large enough quantities for a really good meal."

 

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The veil remnants on the one mushroom is problematic for the Hypsizygus proposal. These appear to all represent the same species.

Each of P. dryinus, H. ulamirius, Neolentinus adhaerens has a white spore print. So you're likely to not settle anything with just spore color. This is the type situation where a microscope will at least help get you into the correct genus. The three types mentioned have different shape/sized spores. P. dryinus has large spores, Hypsizygus has small almost round spores, and N. adhaerens has very narrow spores. 

Of course, these mushrooms may be something other than one of these three possibilities. 

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Thanks a bunch Dave. I kinda figured that was going to be the outcome. Unfortunately I do not have a microscope right now. Just for kicks..... here's the spore print. Pretty neat print !! Really thick !!

Thanks again guys ?

Daniel

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Wow! That is one thick and starkly white print. 

If you're really motivated, then mail me some spores and I'll scope them. Just shovel a decent amount onto a piece of plastic wrap, fold, and put into a letter. A liberal mount would be good, because I may need to mount in several different liquids to get the best view. If you PM me I'll forward my mailing address. I'm kinda interested in this. You get some pretty cool mushrooms down there in Louisiana. 

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Darn Dave !! I whipped that spore print clean off with a paper towel and tossed !! Although..... I messaged my fiancé earlier to throw away the bag I had in the fridge in hopes they were good edibles. However...... I just messaged her to go get them out. Lol. 

Think they will still drop a good print after chilled a couple days, taken out?

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50 minutes ago, The Mushroom Whisperer said:

They should still drop spores.  And by the looks of your pics, there appears to be an ample amount!

I'm with you on that !! That's the most prominent print I've ever collected!! Pretty cool stuff. Fungus are awesome! :veggiedance:

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Gills appear to be attached for at least one of the mushrooms. I think the appearance of free attachment is because some of the gills are "seceding". Attached gills occasionally pull away from the stalk as the mushroom matures. 

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Hey Cajun, I received the spores you mailed. Viewed under the microscope at 400x the size does not fit any of the proposals made by anybody so far. Very large globose to subglobose spores... lengths up to about 22 mu (non-amyloid). IMG_3268.thumb.JPG.73104ad6fbbc701d6af885b36327b953.JPGIMG_3278.thumb.JPG.2a92793d508ea319f1c1b2b4880c4963.JPG

First photo shows spores mounted in Meltzer's reagent. Second photo shows spores mounted in Congo red, a stain that helps bring out details. The micrometer on my scope is inaccurate; add approximately 17% to indicated measurements.

I'm stumped on this one! Cajun, if you email me a couple photos, I'll post on Mushroom Observer. Maybe somebody there will have an idea. 

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We now have what appears to be a solid proposal for the genus, Oudemansiella. http://mushroomobserver.org/275446?q=4pzp  Spore size/shape supports the proposal.  https://www.google.com/search?q=Oudemansiella+spores&tbm=isch&imgil=LTzNV_BoaZ14nM%3A%3BJCn9TzaIaWGHjM%3Bhttps%253A%252F%252Fcommons.wikimedia.org%252Fwiki%252FFile%253A2009-09-30_Oudemansiella_mucida_spores_33925.jpg&source=iu&pf=m&fir=LTzNV_BoaZ14nM%3A%2CJCn9TzaIaWGHjM%2C_&usg=__-P4kBcqfXxwXd_oJVgGRlrOkV8E%3D&biw=1366&bih=638&ved=0ahUKEwjKpa3A7NTTAhUISiYKHbnZAxIQyjcIMw&ei=t2MKWYruEIiUmQG5s4-QAQ#imgrc=LTzNV_BoaZ14nM:

In my area we get a few species of Hymenopellis (formerly Xerula, formerly Collybia, and for awhile, Oudemaniella). Species of Hymenopellis are now reportedly being moved back to Oudemansiella. Those spores you sent me, Cajun... they reminded me of something... couldn't quite put my finger on it. Now it makes sense to me. The spores remind me of Hymenopellis.

Interesting and fun little group project. The person who IDed this to genus is Jacob Kalichman. He's from southern California. 

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Very cool Dave ! I was reading the comments from MO and was getting a kick out of the little continental effort going into IDing this specimen!! Thanks again! ? I'm sure I'll have some other little project for us in the near future. Finally have the garden at a point where I can get out and do more foraging 

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