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Morel Season is just about upon us


ladyflyfsh
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And since there are always so many questions about cooking morels, morel poisoning, and toxins etc. I have posted a bunch of interesting research articles in the Library Forum of this site on various subjects all pertaining to eating mushrooms raw, how long to cook, what can happen if you don't cook your mushrooms long enough, are there toxins in mushrooms, mushroom poisonings etc. Please take a few minutes to check them out and read them.

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Interesting articles. I know someone who, after consuming morels for years, suddenly developed an allergic reaction to them. Also, some people get an upset stomach from thoroughly cooked morels. I never realized a small group of people develop cerebellar or neurological effects from morel consumption. Thank goodness the effects were transitory.

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Nice work, Mary. I have heard about people developing sensitivity to eating morels. So for years now I have made it a point to not eat large quantities of morels --especially fresh morels-- on several consecutive days. One nice thing about morels is that they are easy to dehydrate and, once dried, may be stored for years. So I use them occasionally, and not in large quantities. An ounce of dried morels provides enough flavor for a decent quantitiy of soup, sauce, risotto, stuffing, etc.

As for the contamination in eastern NA apple orchards, I do still hunt a few small old orchards in my locale. I have tested the soil in each of these spots for lead content, and have not recorded any notable lead concentrations. These are all small orchards --maybe 2 to 4 acres-- presumably just typical adjunct land usage for the many former dairy farms around here. So I think these orchards may be okay... although I do still worry about the lead-arsenate issue. These past 8 years or so I have concentrated more on finding morel spots related to elm trees, or the "forest" morels found where healthy white ash or tulip poplar trees predominate.

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Tasso, that is so true and anyone could develop an allergy to morels anytime. I know lots of people in my Facebook mushroom groups who've had issues with morels and can no longer eat them. I don't eat many fresh mainly because I have to travel to places in order to even find them and don't usually have access to a place to cook at least not for long, so most of mine end up in the dehydrator where I can enjoy them at home for many years. Dave, glad you are doing soil samples from your orchards. It's a subject that comes up every year, so I thought I'd beat the rush and be proactive!

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