Jump to content
Guest Vlad

Inonotus obliquus fruiting body

Recommended Posts

Guest Vlad

Inonotus obliquus fruiting body.

Tom Volk writes:

Despite extensive searches, I’ve never seen the fruiting body. Hal Burdsall has nver seen it. Leif Ryvarden (of Gilbertson and Ryvarden) has never seen it. Has anyone ever actually seen the fruiting body?

—-tom

This is the quote from this page on Mushroom Observer:

http://mushroomobserver.org/8136?q=45zA

I sent a piece of the fruiting body to Dr. Daniel L. Lindner and he said that he put it into their Wisconsin Herbarium. So if Tom Volk wants to see it, he can go to their herbarium. Or he can look for pictures here on my pages.

http://www.mushroomhunter.net/091208.htm

On the link below I tell the story of my effort to confirm my find.

History of confirmation:

http://www.mushroomhunter.net/history.htm

I tried writing Tom but he does not answer :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Vlad...

an interesting quest... but the story end abruptly on your page... have you receive confirmation about it... the picture look great... the structure of the fruiting body seem so fragile... I will try to find one to see it with my own eyes... I know a few dead birch still standing with the steril conk...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Vlad

Guill,

The thing with the professional mycologists is that they are so busy. To try and get them interested in your particular problem is very difficult. He travels all over the world collecting mushrooms that are probably new to science. When he gets back he is looking forward to analyzing and writing up those new species. The last message I received from him is the one where he ran the DNA test but could not confirm that it was I. obliquus. The point is that he is sure that my ID was correct. That is good enough for me. I did not want to be a nag. Since I did not nag he never wrote me again :)

DNA business is not an exact science. I collected some specimens of Xanthoconium separans for Clark University so that they could study the DNA. They send the mushrooms to Duke to run the DNA. They told me that the first time they sent them they got poor results. I get the impression that they run the DNA test until they get the results they are looking for :) Sounds very unscientific to me :)

If you want to find the fruiting body for yourself, I can give some information that will make it easier. The main thing is that I. obliquus fruits only once. It fruits the year that the tree dies and never again. That is the main reason very few people ever saw the fruiting body. You would have to check the tree with the Chaga every spring and see if it will leaf out. If it leafs out, forget it till next spring. If it does not leaf out keep coming back and checking for a long vertical split in the bark. That is the sign that it is fruiting. Remove the bark to see the fruiting body.

If you want to take a shortcut, chop down a tree infected with I. obliquus, Now keep checking for the split in the bark. The only one I found were on standing birch. The fruiting body would look different on a fallen tree. Since the tubes in the fruiting body have to point down to the ground and be oblique there is very limited space where this fruiting body could grow on a fallen tree. I would say a very thin strip on either side of the tree?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good point Vlad...

never thing of cutting down one... but I'would try it this weekend... I will try to just girdle one with a chainsaw... so the tree will die but remain standing... here the tree dont begin to run sap before at least 1-2 week... so if chaga fruits the next year I will maybe be lucky and get one this summer...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Vlad

Good Idea Guill,

I will try that next year. This year I will pick out the sacrificial tree :)

That way the fruiting bodies will be growing all the way around the tree. There is so little information about the fruiting body that I am not sure if it has a preferred season to fruit. My only live find fruited probably about 9/1 and I found it on the 12th. It was not fresh since mold started growing on part of it.

If I girded a live tree I would check it a few days after a good soaking rain. I do not see why it would not fruit earlier than September.

There was a large Yellow Birch that was blown over by wind and it was infected. At that time I did not know how soon after it dies it fruited so I missed the event. But I did find signs of the fruiting body 3 years later.

http://www.mushroomhunter.net/0803082.htm

I did find a triangular growth on the side of the trunk that looks like it might have been the narrow version of the fruiting body.

If you have success this year make sure to take a lot of good photos. Maybe we then can get the mushroom guide authors to use our pictures in their guides :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Vlad

Now I am glad that I joined Mushroom Observer :o)

“Vladimir, excellent photos. I would like to publish your images in an upcoming issue of FUNGI Magazine (www.fungimag.com) if you will permit us. If so, we will need hi res original photos. We are putting together a big feature on chaga and your photos would be extremely useful and widely seen. Please get back to me to let me know.

Best,

Britt

Editor in chief, FUNGI”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now I am glad that I joined Mushroom Observer :o)

“Vladimir, excellent photos. I would like to publish your images in an upcoming issue of FUNGI Magazine (www.fungimag.com) if you will permit us. If so, we will need hi res original photos. We are putting together a big feature on chaga and your photos would be extremely useful and widely seen. Please get back to me to let me know.

Best,

Britt

Editor in chief, FUNGI”

Congratulations! It's always cool to get publishd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Félicitation Vlad...

and it's nice to know that Fungi will get an article on Chaga...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...