Jump to content

Ganoderma?


eat-bolete

Recommended Posts

I assume this is one of Ganoderma species? Is it useful for anything? It's quite porous and spongy inside, can it be used for fire starting like chaga? I couldn't get a spore print, none were visible. Not sure what tree it grew on, but I think it's some kind of oak. Smells unpleasant.

post-1017-0-89103400-1417538339_thumb.jpg

post-1017-0-75151300-1417538342_thumb.jpg

post-1017-0-65991100-1417538346_thumb.jpg

post-1017-0-60163200-1417538349_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think these are an example of Ischnoderma resinosum, the Resin Polypore. Soft and sometimes exuding "resin" when young, it becomes hard/tough in age. I have no info on its edibility. I run across lots of this every fall, but I have not ever tried eating it.

http://www.mushroomexpert.com/ischnoderma_resinosum.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dave, Is that common that the edge is different color? On most of photos of Ischnoderma at mushroomexpert link, the edges are white and the ones I found have dark edges on both young and older specimen.

I wouldn't eat it, it has chemical smell and texture of cork.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Possibly caused by freezing and drying. I find it interesting how long wood growing species can be around. I have been watching a hericium and a laetiporus for a month now and they still are moist. The hericium actually seemed to have grown even more after recent rains.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From the Mushroom Expert account of I. resinosum, "Pore Surface: When young whitish, soft, promptly bruising brown." This would seem to imply that darkening of the pores requires the application of pressure/injury. But like John said, environmental/atmospheric conditions may hasten a staining reaction. Actually, if you look at the Mushroom Expert photos, the last two show under-developed specimens which show a fair amount of brown. The ones in your photo, eat-bolete, may be older than you think. I. resinosum is one of many types of polypores that develop slowly.

I'm not completely confident about these representing I. resinosum. But, I am more confident they are not a type of Ganoderma.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Guidelines | We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.