Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
WeirdCap

Strange red/brown/green mushroom - Florida

Recommended Posts

A couple of days ago, after a heavy rain, some strange mushrooms started growing in one specific yard in my neighborhood. Since it has been a few days, they are starting to die, but I took some pictures to try to ID them. I've never seen red mushrooms around here before. The gills are bright yellow/green and the whole cap is very thick. Some of the mushrooms caps were no wider than a quarter, and some were bigger than my hands. The stems also have the same strange yellow/green color.

My camera didn't capture the color of the mushrooms too well. The redness of the caps looks brown, and the brightness of the gills/stem has been dulled.

There is one picture of a different mushroom in the yard too. It is brown and has scales on it like a fish on the cap and stem, which I would also like to be ID'd

Thanks!

post-919-0-69486100-1411510527_thumb.jpg

post-919-0-23849200-1411510556_thumb.jpg

post-919-0-29866500-1411510582_thumb.jpg

post-919-0-30225400-1411510613_thumb.jpg

post-919-0-97977200-1411510649_thumb.jpg

post-919-0-89618600-1411510679_thumb.jpg

post-919-0-90282600-1411510714_thumb.jpg

post-919-0-17219000-1411510738_thumb.jpg

post-919-0-29647600-1411510744_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first ones that you asked about may be Boletus oliveisporus. The scaly one is hard to tell based on one photo. If it had pores on the underside like the first one then it is probably a strobilomyces. Just a guess, DaveW is the expert here on boletes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks. If I have time today, i'll take a picture of the gills/pores of the other mushroom. I was thinking the first one might be Boletus pinicola but oliveisporus does look more like it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WeirdCap, the mushrooms in the photo (except for the scaly one that has not opened) do not have "gills" on the undersides. The fertile underside of these is called "pores", and the layer of material that ends in the pores (greenish stuff forming lower portion of a cap) is called the "tubes." Mushrooms with pores/tubes are called "boletes" There are multiple genera (plural of genus) of boletes. "Gills" are the slot-like undersides of mushrooms that may be broadly classified as "agarics" (not a genus name). The white button mushrooms and Shiitake found in stores have gills.

I doubt there are any Boletus pinicola in the photos. The boletes in the photos come from a confusing group of red/yellow species of genus Boletus. I think Boletus sensibilis should be considered. Also, B. pseudosensibilis, B. pallidoroseus, B. miniato-pallescens, among others. Some of these types are sickeners. Area of southeastern eastern North America get some species that I don't see up here in PA. There may be more than one species of Boletus seen in the photos.

A couple things to observe if you take another look at these. Slice a mushroom completely in half lengthwise and observe the quickness and the intensity of any change in color on the cut flesh. This is called "bruising" or "staining." I think the ones in the photos will show considerable bruising. Note how much time it takes for the color to change to blue/blackish. Also, note any distinctive odors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Take a look at Strobilomyces in mushroomexpert.com.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup, that one fooled me in the first photo. I had thought it to be a Macrolepiota or a Chlorophyllum... gilled mushrooms. Almost certainly a species of Strobilomyces, a type of bolete.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those boletes are probably Boletus rubricitrinus which I find a lot of here in SW FL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, speaking of Boletus rubricitrinus, look what I encountered today. They are EVERYWHERE!! After I saw these, I found more at the post office when I went to get my mail. They are considered edible so I'm going to try some tonight.

post-1-0-99634500-1411662412_thumb.jpg post-1-0-68389600-1411662401_thumb.jpg

post-1-0-94906200-1411662388_thumb.jpg post-1-0-29313000-1411662377_thumb.jpg

post-1-0-93813400-1411662365_thumb.jpg post-1-0-45658500-1411673254_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are so many of these mushroom popping up right now, it is making it hard for me to drive my car. My eyes can't keep from scanning the grass!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know what you mean about it being hard to drive because of all the mushrooms. We have had good steady rains for awhile and there are mushrooms everywhere! Can you tell me what are the key characteristics of boletus ribricitrinus that are different from other similar colored boletes. I know that is supposed to be a deep south mushroom but I ran into some today that look very similar. Red caps, yellow pores, heavy solid stems. By the way I really like that last photo. That's a delightful looking little grouping of mushrooms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Less than 0.5" rainfall during the past 30 days in most of my area.

Yesterday I slowed down my car because my attention was diverted to a styrofoam cup on a lawn.

Our local club is sponsoring a Mushroom Fair tomorrow. I *think* I may be able to find some mushrooms 60-80 miles south of here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Except for the fact we don't have a whole lot of choice edibles this far south. There have been a few sightings of Boletellus ananas which I would love to find myself. John, Bessette/Roody says, olive-brown spore print, solitary, scattered or in groups in sandy soild in oak or oak/ pine woods, NJ south to FL and west to TX. Pore surface yellow at first, becoming dull yellow to olive yellow and depressed near the stipe in age. Blueing when bruised, pores irregular.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are getting more rain here too, but we get nice sun breaks for several hours which allows things to soak in and dry. Not like last summer when the ground here was super saturated. No flooding here...yet! I am just in the last two days finding lots of freshly popped Strobilomyces floccopus. Nice unopened little ones. I will have to try them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please let us know how the strobilomyces floccopus turns out. I saw quite a few of them here in the last couple of weeks.

I like them. They aren't the absolute best boletes out there, but they're decent sizzled up in wild garlic butter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...