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By "Banded Mottlegill" I believe you mean Panaeolus cinctulus. The mushrooms seen here may be this species. 

First step to support this ID proposal... spore print color. Collect a spore print on a black surface. Most Panaeolus mushrooms have jet-black spore prints. One exception is P. foenisecii, which has very dark purple-brown spore print. By collecting a substantial print on a black non-absorbent surface, you may be able to see if there is any contrast between the black medium and the dark print. 

If the print is jet-black, then this would eliminate P. foenisecii from consideration. But there still may be other possibilities for the species. Using a microscope may be helpful at that point. 

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4 hours ago, Dave W said:

By "Banded Mottlegill" I believe you mean Panaeolus cinctulus. The mushrooms seen here may be this species. 

First step to support this ID proposal... spore print color. Collect a spore print on a black surface. Most Panaeolus mushrooms have jet-black spore prints. One exception is P. foenisecii, which has very dark purple-brown spore print. By collecting a substantial print on a black non-absorbent surface, you may be able to see if there is any contrast between the black medium and the dark print. 

If the print is jet-black, then this would eliminate P. foenisecii from consideration. But there still may be other possibilities for the species. Using a microscope may be helpful at that point. 

Thank you! I put the Latin name panaeolus cinctulus in the tags sorry I guess I didn’t put it in the post. I was waiting on a spore print result and it just came out jet black. I don’t have a microscope yet, I have been saving up for one. Is it possible to ID without one? Thank you again.

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Forgot to mention the notable farinaceous odor. Also these are growing in my yard around the piles of dog crap I was too lazy to pick up. I don’t know if p. Cinctulus is dung loving or if that helps with ID.

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Most species of Panaeolus favor habitat where dung is present, or where it has been mixed in with soil as a fertilizer. Judging a print color as black vs. very dark brown is best done by collecting the print on a black non-absorbent surface. Any contrast with the black surface will then be seen (but you need a fairly thick print). P. cinctulus looks like the probable ID here. But, like I previously wrote, certainty can be difficult to achieve. 

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