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Mushrooms in a Greek forest🌲


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Hey! So during a field trip in a forest here in Greece I found several small mushrooms hidden under pine needle duff and I would appreciate any assistance in identifying them, since I’m quite new to mushroom foraging. Each cap was 2-2.5cm, beige to muddy brown and distinctively damp with a rubbery texture. A set of slightly decurrent, true gills were also evident that were soft and feathery to the touch. Each stipe was about 2cm long, slightly curved and tapering towards the base, resulting in a threadlike network of mycelium. The flesh was white and moist ,but what stood out the most was the mushroom’s pronounced, fruity fragrant. I suspect Lepista or Clitocybe, even Lactarius and specifically Lepista flaccida, but I can’t find a description that accurately fits mine, so I can’t really tell and could use some help😢1F504C4F-1A17-4225-A52F-85C9FD5EE636.thumb.jpeg.afc6828a2b405b3f46e2635111a33f66.jpeg79234BA6-D2FF-4715-9BBD-6371D66B2BC4.thumb.jpeg.39541b49e21fdd79514423be0d891e22.jpegB33F3BAD-38AB-4337-B187-63B0DE975B2E.thumb.jpeg.217673ee9003242919322e174fad0c32.jpeg73D3D1D8-5FA3-423A-AF7B-8E4A79D33EEB.thumb.jpeg.dd8e5b402de96fb362f17dfa609cd9cf.jpegED72C391-D297-42AE-9B7F-964FC029F0CD.thumb.jpeg.8c911748753d688ef3199146be246307.jpeg

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Well, you picked a difficult example to begin your exploration into Mushroom ID! Photos are good, though. And the written details are useful. 

If this represents a species of Lactarius, then I think there would be visual evidence of latex (liquid) on the broken parts of the gills as seen in the third photo. But, in some cases you need to search for latex in a "milk-cap" mushroom. Do this by gently pressing either a piece of paper or your finger against the sliced gills. Then check for evidence of moisture. 

I don't have first-hand knowledge of Paralepista flaccida (new genus for this species). I think it is probably uncommon in my area. But, a website for California mushrooms documents it, and the description, photos, and habitat seem to fit your mushrooms, including the fragrant odor.   https://www.mykoweb.com/CAF/species/Paralepista_flaccida.html

But, I would am not comfortable with arriving at a confident ID here. There are other species that may look at least somewhat similar to these, in particular species of genus Clitocybe and related genera. The first thing I would want to find out would be spore print color. P. flaccida is said to have a pale creamy yellow print. I think your mushrooms will have a pale print. To see any deviation from white, the print should be collected on a non-absorbent white surface. If the print is white, then it will blend in with the white background. A subtle difference from white will be seen in contrast to the white medium. But, even if you get a pale yellowish print, there are species that look like this and have off-white spore prints. Clitocybe phylloplila comes to mind. Some species of Clitocybe are toxic. After seeing a spore print, I would then use my microscope to examine the spores and maybe a few additional details. Like I said to start, this looks like a possibly tricky ID (except perhaps for someone very familiar with this particular species). 

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On 4/11/2022 at 4:35 AM, Dave W said:

Well, you picked a difficult example to begin your exploration into Mushroom ID! Photos are good, though. And the written details are useful. 

If this represents a species of Lactarius, then I think there would be visual evidence of latex (liquid) on the broken parts of the gills as seen in the third photo. But, in some cases you need to search for latex in a "milk-cap" mushroom. Do this by gently pressing either a piece of paper or your finger against the sliced gills. Then check for evidence of moisture. 

I don't have first-hand knowledge of Paralepista flaccida (new genus for this species). I think it is probably uncommon in my area. But, a website for California mushrooms documents it, and the description, photos, and habitat seem to fit your mushrooms, including the fragrant odor.   https://www.mykoweb.com/CAF/species/Paralepista_flaccida.html

But, I would am not comfortable with arriving at a confident ID here. There are other species that may look at least somewhat similar to these, in particular species of genus Clitocybe and related genera. The first thing I would want to find out would be spore print color. P. flaccida is said to have a pale creamy yellow print. I think your mushrooms will have a pale print. To see any deviation from white, the print should be collected on a non-absorbent white surface. If the print is white, then it will blend in with the white background. A subtle difference from white will be seen in contrast to the white medium. But, even if you get a pale yellowish print, there are species that look like this and have off-white spore prints. Clitocybe phylloplila comes to mind. Some species of Clitocybe are toxic. After seeing a spore print, I would then use my microscope to examine the spores and maybe a few additional details. Like I said to start, this looks like a possibly tricky ID (except perhaps for someone very familiar with this particular species). 

I appreciate your reply. It has being very helpful. I’m doing my research and I’m definitely closer now. Unfortunately, I was unable to obtain a spore print or it could be that it was white and blended with the white background as you said. Clitocybe phyllophila shares very much the same characteristics and odor indeed, except from the beige color. I also suspect Rhizocybe vermicularis, based on the other reply. Also, I’ll keep that technic in mind when examining a lactarius😁

On 4/11/2022 at 11:37 AM, michele said:

it could be an old Clitocybe vermicularis, european species, typical of spring season, with roots at the base of the stem

Thank you for your reply! The species you suggest is identical to mine. The only thing it lacks, based on sources, is the fragrant odor. But I’m convinced this is it. 

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