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Turkey tail?


eulersLog
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The mushrooms were discovered on a felled hardwood tree in the coastal South Carolina lowcountry.  The tops of the caps are smooth and have multiple bands of brownish hues.  The leading edge of the caps are white and gently rounded.  I could not pull a spore print.  The pore surfaces are white and did not bruise.  The flesh was white, very tough to cut and had an earthy/mushroomy smell.

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How thick is the flesh in these polypores, eulersLog? The flesh looks kinda thick for Trametes versicolor (Turkey Tail). Also, the growth habit as a group of well-separated individual fruit bodies is not typical for T. versicolor. I think these may represent some other species of Trametes... maybe T. gibbosa? 

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They're not Turkey Tail.   The basidiocarp is too big, and the pores appear to be too big as well, and it's not growing clustered like others have mentioned.

Dave, T. gibbosa has elongated to mazelike pores, at least over part of the hymenium (they're rounder near the margin), so I don't think it's that.  But another species of Trametes is a good guess.  Maybe T. elegans?   But the radial wrinkles (Top photo) are unusual and don't fit the description of any Trametes that I know.  The wrinkles are somewhat reminiscent of Ischnoderma species, but they have pore surfaces that brown with age, and I would expect the middle picture to not be as pale if it was Ischnoderma.  Plus the cap would be browner.

S. Carolina is quite far away from my region, and it's possible/likely that there are other Trametes there that aren't in my field guides.

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I think these may be Trametes lactinea. The pores look to be larger than those of the similar T. cubensis. I agree these are not T. gibbosa which --as Calvert said-- has elongate/slotlike/mazelike pores. Looking on Mushroom Observer, it appears that T. lactinea is fairly common in the SE areas of NA. Another possibility is T. pavoina, a species of SE NA. 

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