Jump to content

Small King Boletus??


Recommended Posts

Found these around a large old oak tree about 20 to 30 feet away. There is a large root partially exposed that runs to the Bolete patch. This is the only tree around out in the middle of a grass field. Me and our son picked and dried some of these earlier this summer that were 10 to 14 inches in diameter and saw hundreds of little tiny pin heads starting. When sliced the flesh is white and no blueing at all and the larger ones Had yellow to greenish blue yellow hue sponge and stained a very light pink redish brown mix when sliced the wife said a pinkish brown hue. The color was very light the smaller ones stayed white and had a white sponge. Man they have a very pronounced wonderful nutty kind of sweet mild mushroom smell and a quick small taste and spit out it tastes just as it smells heavenly!!!! I would of left these to grow larger but no rain coming and colder temps here some that were getting larger had dried out and no good. My field guide points boletus edulis. If more info is needed just ask I will do my best to answer as my pot of lead is hot and I need to pour some sinkers to make a paycheck!!! Sorry if pics aren't the greatest bad lighting today and in a hurry this morning with a large order to pour. AHHH work always getting in the way of fun!!! LOL Thanks for y'all's help oh these were found in Hampton,VA

IMG_20211106_091646901.jpg

IMG_20211106_091640614.jpg

IMG_20211106_091630566.jpg

IMG_20211106_091620241.jpg

IMG_20211106_091609196.jpg

IMG_20211106_091601113.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quite likely to be in the Boletus edulis complex, but can't say for sure, as all the pictures of the stem are blurry.  It should have "reticulation" which is a net-like pattern of ridges on the upper part of the stem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cap color and (seeming) lack of reticulation on the stems seem unusual for B. edulis. But, the pore surface (undersides) maturing to a yellowish/greenish color points toward genus Boletus. There are oak-associating types of King Bolete that are likely to be found in VA, eg. B. variipes. But these types have noticeably reticulate stalks. 

These remind me somewhat of Boletus huronensis, a species if northern NA that is known to be toxic. To my knowledge, this species has not been recorded in VA. But, it has been found in Connecticut (and areas to the north). The cut flesh of B. huronensis develops patchy blue staining. B. huronensis is believed to associate with hemlock, so I doubt it would grow in oak dominated woods. Seems very unlikely that the mushrooms seen here represent B. huronensis. 

These seem very interesting to me. They don't quite match any species I am familiar with. Were the photos taken indoors? I'm wondering if maybe the color and perhaps some other details are not well-represented in the photos. Best to take photos outdoors but not in direct sunlight. Find a spot that's shaded but close to an open sunlit area; so that you avoid glare but still have good ambient natural light. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dave the photos were taken outside on top of my stainless steel grill early in the morning. Thanks for the advice I’ll give it try until I perfect it.  I’m not teck savvy or the best photographer the photos show the correct colors to my eyes they are on the dry side as we haven’t had any good rain for a minute and there is fine reticulation on them but it is very fine/tight and light is the best way I can describe it. When I handled some and rubbed my dirty fingers on the stem the reticulation was easier to see with the eye. I can’t get a close enough photo to show the reticulation with out it getting blurry and distorted that’s how fine/tight an light it is. The reticulations is no where near as prominent or distinguished as on an a elegant stink horn by any means. There is no blue staining of the flesh anywhere when cut even after 2 days of being cut and monitored every 20 to 30 mins. We have are own small businesses that we work out of the garage and I have a garage fridge so I was able to check on them like that.  We have eaten some of them a small amount waited as advised with no ill affect as there was no red pores or blue staining. 

  I do believe I found Boletus Huronensis in Va earlier this summer wish I would have photoed and documented that find. A light tan irregular cap wavy and upturned that were pointed like sting ray wings they were large about 12 to 14 inches in diameter. These did stain patchy blue throughout the flesh when cut and no reticulation it was hard to say if they had tide marks was light and questionable to me. These were found around oaks that was the only tree around. I have read the couple of articles posted about the boletus huronensis and to me fit the Bill. The caps reminded me of saltwater sting Ray wings when they have them turned up out the water and gliding along if you have ever seen that. I’m completely new and green to mushroom hunting so I could be wrong about thinking I found boletus huronensis in VA earlier this summer but I felt they matched close enough we as a family discarded them. 
       I live on the coast and haven’t found a seasoned person to go with or learn from in person that doesn’t charge a good amount of money. The closest mushroom hunting groups for free I can find are 3 to 4 hours away and not in my family’s budget right now to make the trips to go out with them. Thanks for all the help from everyone and advise is always welcome an appreciated. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay, reticulations on the stalks suggest the mushrooms are one of the "hardwood King Bolete" species... B. variips, B. atkinsonii, or maybe a similar unnamed species. Looks like you have a good spot for an excellent edible. King Boletes may be sliced and dried for future use. If they are properly dehydrated --brittle like potato chips-- they may be stored in air-tight glass jars for years without requiring refrigeration. Dried King Bolete make great soups/sauces/risottos.

If you actually found B. huronensis in VA, that would be notable. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dave I will keep my eye on that spot that I think I found boletus huronensis in but I haven’t seen them pop back up yet. Next year I will definitely check there to see if they come back up and will document photo and post about them here. I’m new to this so take it with a grain of salt so to say.       
      We have already harvested dehydrated and stored 2 gallon ziplock bags full of the King Boletes species and another 2 bags eaten fresh cooked of course. The wife our 6 year old and me love them they sure are delicious and I have several recipes I’ve put together with them using venison,freshwater fish and frog legs that I will share in the cooking section. 
       I put décantent beads in the ziplock bags to help keep them dry that I make myself. If you go to a arts an craft store and go to the flower section they sell a large bag for cheap. Spoon them into a paper coffee filter and tape or tie shut with string and drop in the bag. There’s no scent dye or anything that will affect the mushrooms. A professional chef I know told me about this trick when we were discussing storing venison jerky for longer periods if it ever last that long in our house.  LOL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I assume that by "decantent beads" you mean a dehumidifying agent. That sounds like a good idea. But, those don't continue to work indefinitely. I'd still recommend airtight glass jars, ie. canning jars. Plastic bags do not prevent air exchange. 

In that spot where you found what you IDed as B. huronensis... where there any hemlock trees in that area? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No there was no hemlock trees around only a single old massive oak tree in the middle of a couple acre grass field. Everything I read on the boletus huronensis post matched exactly the way I read and interpreted it even had the wife read and compare it too. We both felt it was too close of a match for us

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Guidelines | We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.