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Boletus Huronensis? or kings


River_Forager
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Was out yesterday found alot of thes...  growing directly from the ground amongst white pines red pines and possible some hemlock and a bunch of other pines.. 

Growing alone and sometimes two growing together.

It has the king bolete thick stem, white rim around cap, netting on stem, etc.. 

However, Im leaning towards Huronesis due to the fact the stem netting is very minimal and when cut in half there is almost immediate blue staining seen most at the top of the cap area. Didn't see much of any "tide mark" typical of the huronensis ?

Thoughts?  (sorry some pics are sideways I tried fixing this but no luck).

Any other tricks to tell these apart?  Is it possible to have both kings and huronensis growing together? 

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I definitely wouldn't eat it if there is blue staining. 

Here is a post about Boletus Huronensis, although the cap and pores seem a little off color, maybe this one is just fresher? Also, the staining in their mushroom appears to be more spotty and not uniform like yours.

https://mushroomobserver.org/observer/show_observation/331948

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B. huronensis lacks reticulation on the stalk. These look more like B edulis to me. However, if there's blue staining then it's not B. edulis. A species that's similar to B. edulis but that exhibits some blue staining --either on the pore surface of where the cap context attaches to the tubes-- is B. subcaerulescens. 

I don't see any blue staining in the photos. 

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Okay, I now se what you mean, Forager. Interesting. The mushrooms look more like B. edulis that B. subcaerulescens to me, and the blue staining of the latter is a brighter more sky-blue hue usually seen on either the pores or where the tubes meet the rest of cap (seen by peeling the tube layer away). These mushrooms do not look like B. huronensis to me, although I have only seen this species first-hand a few times. 

I don't have a confident explanation for the faintly purplish tinge seen on the context just beneath the cuticle. 

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That's a good suggestion, Jeff. B. chippewaensis --which I actually just collected and IDed three weeks ago in the Adorondacks-- has a yellowish cap that is said to develop reddish coloration. (The ones I recently found were yellow.) I see online a few photos labeled as B. chippewaensis with dark reddish almost tending toward purplish caps  https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Boletus_chippewaensis_371997.jpg. Perhaps the pigment that potentially causes the reddish/purplish tint could seep through the cuticle and color the cap context instead of the cap surface...? 

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2 hours ago, Hector var hispanica said:

Boletus Edulis usually has a pinkish staining on the flesh just under the cap, have seen it many times, probably a Boletus Edulis

According to MushroomExpert B. Edulis is a well-known European bolete and it's presence in N.A. is up for debate. Kuo also states the flesh does not change colour when sliced nor does the surface bruise from handling. https://www.mushroomexpert.com/boletus_edulis.html

I am not saying you're wrong (I have no experience with boletes), however after seeing your comment and briefly researching B. Edulis I figured this was worth noting

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Best to be cautious when you aren't certain of the ID for a potential edible. Anomalies like the slightly stained flesh seen on these boletes can be confounding. But, I'd say with confidence that the ones seen here are not B. huronensis; they are one of NA species of King Bolete. Over the years several different species names have been applied. 

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This mushroom was identified on another forum as B. chippewaensis and I immediately thought of this thread.  It was identified by the same person who told me about the pink staining. He seems to be quite familiar with this species and I’ve seen enough of his identification to trust him. Looks very similar to me. 

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0717FA0D-9D02-4044-9954-9972259B994D.png

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Thanks for all the great information!  I found a lot of these right at the camp I was staying at and which I go to often. If there are a King Bolete species (which it sounds like they are) I may fry some up and finally try this talked about mushroom!   

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20 hours ago, Patrick from Ontario said:

According to MushroomExpert B. Edulis is a well-known European bolete and it's presence in N.A. is up for debate. Kuo also states the flesh does not change colour when sliced nor does the surface bruise from handling. https://www.mushroomexpert.com/boletus_edulis.html

I am not saying you're wrong (I have no experience with boletes), however after seeing your comment and briefly researching B. Edulis I figured this was worth noting

Oh well, didn't know that¬†B.Edulis¬†in N.A is up for debate. I don¬īt mean bruising or change of color of the surface. If you peel the cuticule of the cap or cut it in half you can notice that near the cap the flesh is pinkish, not because of staining or bruising, that¬īs how the flesh is, that is what i meant, didn¬īt choose my wording wisely haha

 

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Hector, is the pinkish area under the cuticle something you see with King Boletes in Spain? 

I suspect that the name "Boletus edulis" has been applied in a broad general sense --not only in NA but also Europe-- such that more than one taxon has been included. In NA there's a study currently being conducted. I have submitted material for this study (for sequencing) and hope to have access to the results sometime within the following several months. 

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