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Lactarius?


rbenn
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20210908_114837.jpg

20210908_114829.jpg

 

Looks like Lactarius subvellereus, but it seems the spore measurement is a bit off, although I included spore ornamentation which I shouldn't have. I may check them again.

 

Apparently taste is hot. Is it safe to taste and spit these? Does anyone eat these? 

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Did it have a lot of white latex? Did a slice across the gills turn dark brown? Fishy odor? If all of these answers are "yes" then probably Lactifluus luteolus. Otherwise... nothing else comes immediately to my mind. 

Evaluating the spore ornamentation on species of Lactarius/Lactifluus/Russula requires that the spores are mounted in Melzer's reagent. The warts/ridges are amyloid, and as such the ornamentation becomes apparent after it runs black in the Melzer's. 

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I wouldn't say a ton of latex, I wouldn't say the gills turn brown upon slicing although they naturally seem to get yellow brown with age, and odor is like a common mushroom.

Well I've probably got about 10 of these popped up on the forest floor near some oak, ash, and shelbark hickory. They are quite large.

 

Thanks for the Melzer's info. Unfortunately I don't have access to any at this time till I find a different doc.

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Except for Lactifluus luteolus, all the robust white milk mushrooms found in my area taste acrid. Looking through the NA Milk Mushroom book I see the species L. maculatipes, a whitish mushroom that may or may not develop pale yellow concentric zones on the cap. It is said to taste slowly acrid. With the ones that are slowly acrid you may need to allow the nibbled it to remain on your tongue for a minute or more in order to properly assess the taste.

Even if you get a doctor to write a script for Melzer's, it's nearly impossibly to get an American pharmacy to mix it for you. In other countries Melzer's is legal, but providers refuse to mail it into the USA. 

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Hmm, I definitely did not nibble for a minute, more like 5-10 seconds. So that could be.

 

Yes, I do have access to many countries to obtain melzers without shipping. However, they won't ship for good reasons... It is a controlled schedule drug technically so you would essentially be smuggling drugs if you bring it through customs or posses without a script. So for now I suppose it is a obselete method for study of spores until a alternative can be developed, at least for amateurs like me.

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The problem is not with the Melzer's; it's the chloral hydrate (date-rape drug), an essential ingredient in the reagent. Once mixed, Melzer's is not viable for the illicit purpose. I'm pretty sure that any university with a lab that engages in Mycology has Melzer's on hand. So, how does a university mange to obtain Melzer's legally? I don't know the answer to this. 

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It still contains the chloral hydrate, so to me it's still illegal technically.

Very controlled for university. They have to apply to get authroziation for use of a substance, then be registered (license) with the DEA to order the subtance which must be renewed annually. Once in possession it's suppose to be locked up and records maintained of use. Im sure a mycologist could justify using it for "field research" and take it home then.. 

I've heard of some mushroom clubs applying for this permit and distributing small amounts out for members.

Actually, looking into it a bit more, here is a link from one of my local universities for this very thing which is applicable as melzers would only be a schedule 4 substance :

https://ehs.msu.edu/lab-clinic/cont-sub/getting-started.html

 

I would need :

  • Credentials to conduct the proposed research
  • Protocol of the proposed research

Doubt amateur mushroom identification counts, but if you were part of a research project you probably could use this method, especially if you were supporting a phd with some research.

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