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Oyster versus Angel Wing


Peterparker
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Those are deff oyster I harvested a huge fruiting body near my tree and battered and fried them I can tell by the fanning of the mushroom itself 

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To be extra sure though I would wait for more peer reviews to be sure of it's edibility 

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Peterparker's mushrooms are possibly a species of Pleutorus, true Oyster Mushrooms. I think they represent the species P. pulmonarius, a summer species that often features a short stalk that may be centrally or laterally attached to the cap. But, in order to eliminate the possibility of Pleurocybella porrigens (Angel Wings) one needs to determine if the wood is from a hardwood or conifer. Pleurotus grows on hardwood; Pleurocybella grows on conifer. Also, the spores of these two genera are much different from one another, but one needs a microscope with 400x magnification to access this trait. 

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I concur. Most likely red maple (Acer rubrum). Lichens dominate the outer bark so color is hard to distinguish but the large fissures are a good indicator for maples given live oaks (Quercus virginiana) are not typically found in your region. Also, the sapwood (alburnum) is a good amount lighter than the heartwood (duramen), which appears more reddish in your first posted pictures.

Maybe take a look at any full/intact leaves from that specific tree if possible? Leaves have better distinguishing characteristics to be certain. 

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  • 10 months later...

Looks like pleurotus pulmonarious and while its true that angels grow on conifers, the pleurotus pulmonarious is also found on conifer especially in central Idaho. Most often on white fir.

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I have heard that Pleurotus is infrequently found on conifer wood. 

Pleurotus mushrooms tend to be meatier than Pleurocybella (Angel Wings), and the gills a bit deeper and more widely-spaced. The presence of a stalk is more likely with Pleurotus. 

But, the one way to gain high confidence is to scope spores (at least 400x). Pleurocybella spores are almost round; Pleurotus spores are at least twice as long as they are wide. 

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