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Staveshaver

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Everything posted by Staveshaver

  1. I found about 9 Sheepshead today but most were babies... some about the size of a golf ball. I saw these from about 70-80 yards away across a big clearing, and when I got there, saw there were several tiny ones just starting. There's three little ones starting on the other side of the tree. I'm going to try to take pics as they grow. They are in a VERY busy part of a city park though, so someone else may cut them. I found these Jacks right along the road as I was checking on a spot where I found Hens last year during a drive-by.
  2. I got the Opinel a couple of weeks ago and haven't used it yet. I bet it will get in under most Hens and Sulfurs ok. I've carried a Bowie though and even it was barely big enough for the biggest ones.
  3. Yeah, I've found a bunch of Sulfurs and Dryads that way too.
  4. Today after work I checked on a few Sheepshead spots to no avail, and then as I was leaving the park there was a road crew working there right in another spot I like to park, so I figured I'd just leave and come back another day. As I'm about to drive past the fella holding the stop/slow sign, something catches my eye as I glance out my window into the woods and see it... my first Hen of the season. A medium sized, solid beige color. I only looked for a split second and kept driving, but it pegged my Hen radar. It's weird how you can pick them out while driving like that. I've spotted many while driving, sometimes where many thousands of folks have driven and walked by. I guess the vast majority just doesn't share our interest. Last year was an exceptional year here in western Pa for Sheepshead and since I was spotting them on occasion from the road, I took a day and went 'road hunting' them. I don't like to eat them if they grow close to the road, especially dirt or gravel roads, but 15-20 yards back? I'm on em. It drives the wife nuts sometimes if she's with me. Half the fun is getting out and spending time in the woods, but I was wondering if anyone else has caught sight of them out the window while they were driving? While looking for Hens, I also found a handful of Chanterelles growing in the same spot I found my first ones of the season two full months ago. I had given up on that spot quite some time ago. Perhaps I need to rethink that strategy. And these guys. I suspect these are Honeys perhaps?
  5. That slug looks glad you left it behind.
  6. In the Chanterelles I find, it seems a few bugs get to them early on, but only eat a tunnel up through the stem and usually out the top. If the shroom looks good otherwise, I keep it, then when i get home, discard the stem, tear the mushroom in half right through the bug hole and rinse and clean around the affected area with a knife or soft toothbrush. If they're quite a bit older and the tops have bug holes throughout, or a slug's been eating underneath, I leave them where I found them.
  7. I like that first picture of the Pholiota. Nice. Thanks for the i.d. on the ghost plant too. I've been seeing them and didn't know what they were.
  8. Eww, exciting. That's about 2 1/2 hours from my camp in north central Pa.
  9. I received Mushrooms of the Northeast, by Marrone and Sturgeon yesterday as per Dave's recommendation. I love it. Not only am I learning new things about mushrooms in the first few pages(I'm relatively new), leafing ahead, the book looks organized for easy use and small enough to take afield. I probably wont carry it in the woods, but actually think it may fit in my back pocket, to give a size reference.
  10. A spore print is a method used to help identify mushrooms. It's done by placing a mushroom cap on a piece of paper, covering it, and allowing it to remain there for a day or so. The spores fall onto the paper and show as a dusting of color. The spore color can then be used to help distinguish that mushroom from others.
  11. Sure looks like Reishi to me, but I'm no expert. This was the first year I found them, found them in numbers, and they looked just like that, only bigger.
  12. Color, grouping, veils... looks like they could be honey mushrooms, but that picture is much too blurry for anyone to make a positive i.d. They could be a lot of things.
  13. I think I found that orange/yellow mushroom in one of my books. Pholiota aurivella... Golden Pholiota. Sure looks like it.
  14. We had a great year for sheepshead here last year, I hunted them hard and found 113 of them. 11 around one tree! I hope we have another good year this time. I bought a big dehydrator today in anticipation :^)
  15. In regard to bow staves for archery. I make them. Pholiota aye? I'll look it up. Thank you guys.
  16. I like this one too. No idea what it is, but I think it's looks cool... and see the little bug caught on the sticky surface?
  17. Thanks. Yeah, last year was an epic year for shrooms here. I thought perhaps a once in a lifetime event, but I hope not. I was covering a LOT of new territory too, and found some awesome places. One place I named 'Valley of the Shrooms' because it was so deep, dark, damp, and bountiful every time I entered. I found so many, and such a wide variety, many I had only seen in books up to that point... not my most productive for edibles.... but still my favorite place to visit.
  18. It's hard to tell in the picture, but that sulfur growing on the side of the cherry tree was huge. I had to go home and get a ladder to reach it, and when I cut it off in one piece it hit me in the chest and almost knocked me off the ladder. Couldn't put my arms around it and it weighed over 20 lbs. Here's that day's cache.
  19. I thought I had those in better focus. I resized most of them though and I think they can get blurry when I do that.
  20. Since I'm new here, I have a bunch of mushroom pictures on my phone you guys haven't seen, and I'm bored, I'm going to post some that I took within the last year or so. The first picture is of a mushroom that I found growing out of a knothole on an ancient apple tree on my grandfather's place. The tree is at least 90 years old. I have no idea what kind of mushroom it is.
  21. Yes, I'm excited as my favorite time of year approaches. Last year was a banner year for sulfurs and sheepshead here and I hunted hard and found a bunch of new spots, so I'm anxious to see what's out there. Good luck to you and everyone here in the coming weeks.
  22. Sometimes their colors have a lot to do with the lighting or camera. A single mushroom can seem to change color when you bring it inside or carry it from one room to another. I like younger sulfurs whose leading edge isn't as sharp. When they're rounded, or puffy like pouted lips, generally, more of the mushroom is quite tender. When they get older and thin along the outer edge, they start getting woody back near the tree or log... and then that toughness progresses outward as days go by.
  23. I never have either. Every time I see something glowing white in the woods I get excited, but for naught.
  24. Laetiporus sulphureus, also known as Sulfur Shelf, or Chicken mushroom.
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