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  1. Yesterday
  2. Also... in the quiche, shredded Swiss cheese, small amount of either diced shallot or diced sweet green pepper in the skillet with the morels, and some sherry to deglaze the skillet.
  3. Note that the article says that 11 other diners suffered from symptoms similar to those of the person who died; so, it was not likely to be an allergic reaction. I suspect that it was a case of undercooked morels. There was a similar incident at a wedding in Vancouver, BC, some years ago. Quite a few people became ill from raw morels in a salad provided by the caterer.
  4. Last week
  5. That reads like a good recipe. In central Italy wild asparagus is quite common and is more tasty than the cultivated variety and would be perfect in your quiche. I just need to find the morels and the fiddle heads.
  6. Here is the story too if you don't have a login to the telegraph. https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6728349/Woman-diner-dies-hours-eating-poisonous-mushrooms-Michelin-starred-restaurant-Spain.html
  7. I didn't read the entire article provided in Tasso's link. (You need to register and become a member of the site where the article is posted.) But, I did read far enough to see that the alleged culprit was a species of Morchella. So, I'm wondering about the viability of the proposal that the mushrooms were actually a species of Gyromitra. Especially in Europe, where Morchella and Gyromitra are both consumed, the difference is well understood. Presumably the experienced chef knew how to distinguish. There are documented incidents in which people became ill after consuming raw morels. Suggestions that morels should be "well cooked" are common throughout the popular literature. My understanding is that a volatile toxin present in morels (presumably in relatively insignificant amounts) is removed by cooking the mushrooms. So, my guess is the chef failed to cook the presumed morel mushrooms long enough to remove the toxin. Perhaps the victim had a preexisting physical disposition making her particularly susceptible to the toxin? The article says other customers eating at the same restaurant were sickened that same evening. I personally know one person who once became ill after eating a skillet-full of sauteed "baby" Fire Morels (probably Morchella tomentosa). In this case there are a few things to consider as contributing factors. Perhaps the young unexpanded morels contained above-average levels of the toxin? Some volatile toxins evaporate either while a mushroom remains in-situ or soon after it's harvested. Also, quantity consumed is a consideration. And, do some species of Morchella contain higher levels of toxins that others? I once spoke to a professional mycologist who told me that, over the course of time, he developed a sensitivity to consuming morels and ultimately stopped eating them. I tend to use morels sparingly, as one component of an overall meal. Once a year I make "Forager's Quiche", which features asparagus from our garden, fiddle-heads, wild leeks, and a skillet-full of well cooked fresh morels (sauteed prior to being baked in the quiche). I haven't ever had a problem.
  8. My mushroom book says that in some parts of Europe Gyromitra are still consumed after some prolonged cooking. To suffer such a strong poisoning you would probably have to eat them raw or be allergic. May be some other mushroom was included by accident. I have been looking out for morels for quite a few years but I have never found them.
  9. troutddicted

    MOREL POISONING, OR GYROMITRA???

    Wow, so sad to hear this. Sounds like the chef knew what he was doing, perhaps she had an allergic reaction? Wonder what the autopsy will reveal.
  10. Cook all mushrooms thoroughly and be sure you ID them. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2019/02/20/spanish-woman-dies-eating-poisonous-mushrooms-michelin-stared/
  11. Dave W

    Mushroom ID

    Need to see --at minimum-- the undersides of the caps... gills, gill attachment to stalk. A description of the spore print color --probably some shade of brown-- would be helpful. Habitat --wood chips-- supports a proposal of genus Agrocybe. The overall brown color, and the white rhizomorphs (strands) attached to the bases of the stalks, are traits associated with Agrocybe mushrooms. But, the abruptly enlarged stalk bases remind me more of genus Cortinarius. These types of mushrooms --many different species-- grow near live trees.
  12. Andaalaar

    Mushroom ID

    Found these growing in wood chips after the rain. Can someone help identify?
  13. GCn15

    What are these guys?

    I thought they were just washed out older specimens but you may be right. That's how our alveolaris look up here when they get older.
  14. Earlier
  15. Dave W

    What is this?

    I agree, Pluteus is likely the correct genus; likely something form the Pluteus cervinus group. Although the cap margins appear to possibly be striate... ie with shallow grooves, which would be atypical for P. cervinus. If these do represent a species of Pluteus, then the spore print will be tannish-pink. Entoloma mushrooms have similarly colored spore prints. One main difference between genus Pluteus and genus Entoloma is that the former has gills that are free of the stalk (do not reach the stalk). No Entoloma mushrooms have free gills, although some types have gills that taper to a thread-like thickness where the attachment occurs. The following link shows an Entoloma mushroom collected by a member of the local mushroom club here in NE PA. The collector originally believed it to be a Pluteus. https://mushroomobserver.org/317228?q=hT36 When there's doubt as to Pluteus vs. Entoloma, viewing the spores at 400x (microscope) immediately settles this question.
  16. Dave W

    What are these guys?

    I think these may be Favolus brasilensis. This species is similar to Neofavolus alveolaris (aka. Favolus alveolaris, Polyporus alveolaris), except the fruit bodies are pure white. https://mushroomobserver.org/name/show_name/44089 . F. brasilensis is reported to occur in Florida. http://arborist.forest.usf.edu/floridafungi/28 . N. alveolaris is generally an orangish color on the upper cap surface, and the surface tends to be scaly/patchy. Although I have found examples up here in PA with nearly white and fairly smooth caps. Not sure if they are N. alveolaris or some other species (presumably Favolus). https://mushroomobserver.org/318685?q=hT36
  17. troutddicted

    What is this?

    Three mushrooms, leaves and a piece of wood - sorry couldn't resist 🤣 Pluteus?
  18. GCn15

    What are these guys?

    These appear to be Polyporus Alveolaris, They are edible when young. These appear to be older specimens.
  19. daryl

    What are these guys?

    I found some of the white oyster mushroom looking ones over the weekend in South Florida. Though they might be oyster mushrooms but the pores / gills confused me. Had them identified on a online group, and like Dave W said above, they appear to be Favolus. They came back to me with an id of Favolus brasiliensis. They are found in Florida and South America and accordign to my online research some people including but not limited to the native people in the jungles of Brazil and Bolivia eat them. I am no expert and I dont know if they should be eating or not, I dont know what good or bad compounds they may contain. I am just passing on online info so further in depth researh and learning can be done. Here are some images I took including a clear view of the honeycomb pores on the bottom. The group is also known as honeycomb mushrooms. If anyone has more details on if these musrooms are good to eat please respond.
  20. Whothatchineze

    Northern California coastline ID help

    Yes lots. Thunderstorms in San Simeon. Sorry I didnt get pics of the stalk.
  21. Dave W

    Northern California coastline ID help

    Need to see views of the underside and of the entire stalk. In particular, seeing whether or not the gills attach to the stalk is an important ID character. Whatever it is, it looks to be post-mature and kinda blown out. Has there been a lot of rainfall in the area?
  22. I was visiting a national monument when I walked by this little guy. It looked very peaceful in a clearing surrounded by local coastal fauna (should of taken a pic sorry!), so I didn't bother it. Any ideas what it might be? It is the most bizarre mushroom I have ever come across!
  23. Staveshaver

    2018 photos

    Nice pics. Mushrooms are awesome!
  24. Dave W

    Is this a Bolete?

    Trout... Large bloated fruit body with soggy-looking cap surface (maybe it's just wet?). Flesh looks like it lacks density. Past prime... But like your Grandma would do, I slice and dry ones like this. I label them "Grade B" and use them exclusively in soup where the rehydrated mushrooms (and onions and celery) are pureed in a food processor. So, the flabby/soggy texture is not a factor. The soup is great!
  25. troutddicted

    Is this a Bolete?

    Way past its prime Dave? Grandma would slice that thing up and dry it out "so all the bugs vacate the shroom as ot dries" 😂 I never eat at grandmas house anymore.
  26. Evan

    Hello Newb here

    They definitely look like oysters and will probably grow again on the same tree. I'm a little farther north in southern PA. I'm sure you can find some of the same mushrooms there. We pick morels, chanterelles, yellow foot, black trumpet, puffballs, boletes, hedgehogs, chicken of the woods, hen of the woods, oysters, and I'm sure some others I'm forgetting. Your best bet is to find someone who is experienced hunting mushrooms in your area. There may even be a local club that you can join. Sorry you haven't gotten a response sooner. The page is a little slow this time of year. Most of us don't find many mushrooms during the winter.
  27. vitog

    Is this a Bolete?

    Including a picture of the entire stem of the mushroom would help a lot for identification.
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