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  3. Thank you! I rarely find large and bug free ones too. These were beauties. Been back to that spot multiple times this week and no new guys. Hoping this next spell of rain will get them excited again.
  4. Dave W

    Help identifying large mushroom?

    Best to mention all reasonable possibilities, especially the ones that are toxic.
  5. Vermonter

    Pleurotus survey - oyster aficionados wanted

    Thanks a lot Dave W! I was initially concerned about the possibility of Pleurocybella porrigens with the white ones, but then learned that the maple tree ruled that out. I read about the illnesses and deaths attributed to P. porrigens and definitely plan to avoid them, even though I know some people continue to eat them.
  6. Here's another bolete that was common this past July and August in Western PA. Sometimes the cap was lumpy and irregular but sometimes it was smooth and convex. Called it Tylopilus alboater. Some people love it.
  7. Vermonter

    Help identifying large mushroom?

    You're right, troutddicted, it would be awfully big. I was thinking Scleroderma citrinum could get close to that big, but wouldn't have so much of a stem. I was just looking at photos of the species of Calvatia that Dave W specified, and see that cyathiformis seems a very good fit. Sorry to be needlessly alarmist!
  8. The one I called pseudosensibilis did bruise blue. They were nice looking until I handled them. Large flushes August into September. Suillus was mostly absent this year, at least in the conifers I visit. Several Leccinum species were common this year. It stains black. rugosiceps?
  9. Steve, your bolete looks like Boletus separans. If correct, the flesh/pores should not stain or bruise and the flesh should taste mild (not bitter). This type sometimes has a reticulate stalk surface (netting on the stalk surface, may be very fine), but not always. Bobby, I agree your bolete looks like Lanmaoa pseudosensibilis (formerly in genus Boletus). Except, I don't see any staining/bruising on it. This species bruises blue very easily, especially on the pore surface. If it did indeed fail to bruise/stain, then maybe look at genus Auriboletus. Very likely not Baorangia bicolor, as the way the pores/tubes attach to the stem (recessed) is wrong for bicolor. Neither of the boletes seen in the last two posts represent Gyroporus castaneus.
  10. Almost certainly a species of Mycena... possibly M. semivestipes. But, there are a whole lot of different Mycena species, and of these many look like the ones seen here and grow on wood in clusters like the ones seen here.
  11. Dave W

    Help identifying large mushroom?

    Looks like a species of Calvatia to me... maybe either C. cyathiformis or the nearly identical C. craniiformis. These are true puffballs, edible when pure white inside (with a uniform consistency of whipped cream cheese). Although I don't think these are a species of Sclerodema (the "Earth Ball" mentioned by Vermonter). Mature Scleroderma looks like charcoal on the inside... dark gray and somewhat grainy. But, immature Scleroderma can be almost completely white inside. The texture is much denser/firmer than with true puffballs. In my area S. citrinum is the most common species. These have pointed scales on the skin. But there are a few other species of Scleroderma that have either smooth skin, or skin that breaks apart into a "mosaic" pattern similar to the mushroom seen in this discussion. Scleroderma species are toxic. As I said, I think this one is a Calvatia. Never saw it surrounded by snow (except for old sporulating versions). But, I suppose that in S. Carolina one would expect the weather in early December to be not a whole lot different than late October up here in PA. If you get a photo of the vertically sectioned mushroom, we can then provide a more confident ID. In addition to the concern regarding Scleroderma, true puffballs may also be imitated by Amanita "buttons". The young --possibly dangerously poisonous-- Amanita mushroom at first has a covering called the universal veil. This veil eventually breaks apart into either scales on the cap or a basal "volva". But, when the young Amanita is completely covered, it looks like a puffball.
  12. troutddicted

    Help identifying large mushroom?

    Damn! Never have seen earthballs get so big, if its black inside dont consume it. If its white, its alright 🍄
  13. P. dryinus does have a nice flavor. I think some people tend to give it a low rating because the flesh can be a bit tough/chewy, especially near the stem. In my experience, the "summer Oysters" --P. pulmonarius-- have white spores, and the early/late P. ostreatus have the smoky-lilac spores. Mushroom Expert says the spores for P. populinus are always white. Also, P. populinus has larger spores (when viewed under a scope), but ostreatus and pulmonarius have spores with very similar measurements. I suppose that pale versions of ostreatus may be easily confused with pulmonarius. Perhaps my cap color-scheme suggestion is an oversimplification. But, in my experience, pulmonarius --which is usually smaller and with thinner flesh than ostreatus-- is always (almost) pure white. also, as Mushroom Expert says, pulmonarius often features a well-formed stem, sometimes almost centrally attached to the cap which gives some of the mushrooms an appearance that's seemingly unusual for an Oyster Mushroom. Of course, this is all basically academic, as Oyster Mushrooms are all good edibles. I bring some home whenever I find them. But, one related concern is the similarity of Pleurocybella porrigens (Angel Wings) to Pleurotus. P. porrigens grows on coniferous wood, as opposed to Pleurotus which is always found on wood of deciduous trees. There have been a few disturbing incidents regarding the consumption of P. porrigens. In Japan, some older people with pre-existing conditions associated with liver function became quite ill after consuming P. porrigens. I am now told that there have been more than one such incident, and that a toxin has been isolated out of P. porrigens. The specific illness suffered by victims affects the brain. Thus, the implication is that the toxin may affect a person whose liver does not function well enough to filter out the toxin before it finds its way through the bloodstream to the brain. I find this species on hemlock wood. I saw quite a bit this past fall. I used to collect it for the table, but I no longer consume it. Generally, thinner-fleshed than Pleurotus, but it does look fairly similar to white Oyster Mushrooms. Spore morphology immediately distinguishes Pleurocybella from Pleurotus.
  14. Vermonter

    Help identifying large mushroom?

    I think this looks like an earthball, genus Scleroderma, rather than a puffball. Earthballs are generally considered inedible or poisonous.
  15. I’m in the upstate area, SC. Usually doesn’t snow much here but we just recently had a storm. I see mushrooms around my house pretty frequently, finally getting into trying to find out which of my local varieties are edible.
  16. troutddicted

    Help identifying large mushroom?

    Puffball! While they are still white on the inside these are fantastic eating! Where is all this snow and mushrooms?
  17. Vermonter

    Pleurotus survey - oyster aficionados wanted

    Thanks a lot for your input, Dave W! I didn't bother with spore prints, because I had read that the various Pleurotus species have the same range of colors: white-yellow-gray-lilac. Mushroomexpert.com for example has "whitish, grayish, or lilac" for P. pulmonarius and "white to faintly yellowish, or lilac" for P. ostreatus. However, other sources name other overlapping combinations within that range. I'm interested to hear that you have noticed a clear distinction. I really enjoyed the flavors and textures of both of these finds. I harvested some of the late season ones after they had frozen solid, and found them to taste sweeter than before freezing. But the Pleurotus I found most delicious this year were ones I believe to be P. dryinus (posted here)--surprisingly, because they don't have a great reputation as an edible.
  18. It was the only one in the area next to my road... picked it, left a little in the ground... apologies for the sloppy picking 🤷🏼‍♂️
  19. They do look similar to that-I just now went out and picked a jar full of the best examples...
  20. I'd call the white ones "pulmonarius" and the gray ones "ostreatus". IMO the late-season ostreatus with the gray/tan/brown caps are the best edible type in the genus. One way to distinguish is by spore print color. Pulmonarius (and also P. populinus) have white spore print. Ostreatus has a pale smoky gray faintly lilac-tinged spore print.
  21. Need to see more details, or at least read a description. I think these are likely a species of Mycena. M. semivestipes is a cold weather species https://mushroomobserver.org/314042?q=boks.
  22. Dave W

    STOKE-ON-TRENT MUSHROOM find

    Need more details. For starters, the undersides of the caps.
  23. Dave W

    ID Help, perhaps chicken?

    I think this may be Inonotus quercustris. As the species name implies, this southern NA species grows on oak. http://www.mushroomexpert.com/inonotus_quercustris.html
  24. Dave W

    what is this mushroom

    Gray gills could also mean Psathyrella (in addition to Hypholoma). But, tough stems would eliminate Psathyrella from consideration. Agrocybe (or the recent split-off genus Cyclocybe) is another possibility. Stropharia has gills that transition through a gray stage (although these don't look like any Stropharia I know). There's probably other possibilities that don't immediately come to my mind. In order to have a serious discussion about mushroom ID, multiple traits either need to be readily observable, or carefully described. For starters, seeing the undersides of the caps would be helpful.
  25. Vermonter

    Pleurotus survey - oyster aficionados wanted

    Thanks for your input Steve B! I think the white ones are a good fit for P. pulmonarius also. However, when I first posted pictures of them on a local facebook group, a member with a good deal of experience believed them to be P. ostreatus. That's why I'm looking for more opinions.
  26. They are definitely two different species in my opinion. Here's what Mushroom Expert says on the subject: "The separation of Pleurotus pulmonarius from the better-known, "true" oyster mushroom, Pleurotus ostreatus, is based on very good evidence that covers the three "species concepts" most commonly applied to fungi. In the laboratory, Pleurotus pulmonarius cannot "mate" with the other species in the oyster complex, so it is a good biological species. It also represents a fairly distinct morphological species, since it is paler (and frequently smaller) than the brownish Pleurotus ostreatus and appears to develop more of a stem, more of the time. DNA evidence supports Pleurotus pulmonarius as a phylogenetic species and, to top it all off, there is an ecological difference: it appears in warmer weather, appearing from late April through September, while Pleurotus ostreatus favors cold-weather conditions and appears from October through early April."
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