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  2. I think you have an observation here that qualifies --at very least-- as uncommon. Most often I find C. septentrionalis on maple.
  3. They are a bit on the large/thick side for T. versicolor. Another possibility for the species is T. hirsuta. But I would not dismiss the possibility of T. versicolor. Spore size for these two species is quite different, but you need a microscope to make this distinction. Color of fruit bodies is not inconsistent with my concept of T. versicolor.
  4. Oh, i see! Here it is rather common. After the first rainfalls of autumn the forests have plenty of L. Salmonicolor, L. deliciosus, L. Sanguifluous. Yes, they are really tasty! I usually fry them, and this time i also made a mushroom soup, coz i found really a lot (over 5 kg). It was really awesome!
  5. The arced one was attached to a decaying log, A large portion of the center was rotted out. Thanks
  6. Yes, The fungus was growing in a rough oval cluster, I think the tree may have been oak but im not sure, The pictures on the website that you linked look just like it too. The only thing that doesn't match up is the expected range, I guess it was a rare find?
  7. The pore surface has tiny pores. I thought turkey tail weren't this color, and were a lot smaller?
  8. I find H. albocrenulata in my local woods. At the end of my driveway there's an old sugar maple that occasionally gets one or two on the base of the trunk https://mushroomobserver.org/283283?q=12Adu . Once the scales are washed off the cap surface, IDing this species is trickier https://mushroomobserver.org/322780?q=12Adu .
  9. All really nice photos! I have heard that L. salmonicolor is really good edible type. Here is eastern NE we don't have this species. Northern areas have L. thyinos (an okay edible) and southern areas have L. salmoneus (which I have never eaten).
  10. Thanks Dave, I believe you're right and I will remember those pointers. I'm impressed you were able to figure it out, there is sparse information about them online. All of the sources I found online seem to repeat the same few sentences about Hemistropharia
  11. Thanks for the reply Dave, the darker one is -probably- a lactarius salmonicolor. I give some more pictures below. It has orange color and sometimes -from what i ve seen so far- darker orange stains in the gills.
  12. Generally best to harvest a few specimens and photograph different aspects... undersides, entire stalks. I think these all may be Hemistropharia albocrenulata https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemistropharia . As seen in the last two photos, the white triangular scales along/near the margin of the dark brown caps point toward this species. The ones in the top photo have less prominent scales, perhaps due to rainfall/erosion.I feel less confident about suggesting H. albocrenulata for the ones in the top photo. With the ornamentation (presumably) washed off the caps, they look somewhat like Galerina marginata, a deadly poisonous species.
  13. Need to see the undersides. However, these look to be quite old and dried up. Probably not possible to confidently propose an ID.
  14. First two photos, the white ones look like a species of Hygrophorus. Do the gills have a waxy feel? First two photos, the one with what appears to be slightly darker gills; what is the orangish stain near the stalk? It looks to me like it may be orange latex. Gray mushrooms in last two photos look like a species of Tricholoma. But genus Entoloma is another possibility. Spore print color would help here.
  15. Looks like the long arced one was a completely laterally attached "shelf". I think these are Ganoderma sessile. Although the one fruit body with the stubby stalk is not typical for G. sessile, Mushroom Expert does mention this possibility http://www.mushroomexpert.com/ganoderma_sessile.html .
  16. Were the mushrooms growing laterally attached to the tree and (roughly) in the formation of an oval? Do you know the type of tree? Looks like Climacodon septentrionalis, except Florida is further south than the reported range for this species. http://www.mushroomexpert.com/climacodon_septentrionalis.html
  17. I just messaged you. Hope we can get something going!
  18. Resolution for photo of underside is not sharp enough to see whether the surface is smooth or with tiny pores (which may require minor magnification to see). My guess is these are a species of Trametes, possibly T. versicolor, Turkey Tail.
  19. Need to see more details; in particular the undersides. Not confident about an ID proposal, but these remind me of Armillaria tabescens, except maybe more yellow than I expect with this species. Also, the group of mushrooms seen appear to be individual fruit bodies. A. tabescens usually grows in clusters with stalk bases fused together. Knowing the spore print color would help.
  20. Yesterday
  21. Hello, I'm a complete novice when it comes to mushrooms. Recently I stumbled upon a fallen Beech tree and I was impressed with the many different kinds of fungi were growing from it. I'm hoping you guys can perhaps identify a few. The forum rules state that you can only ask for identification of one mushroom per thread, so I am going to post multiple threads asking for identification of each mushroom on the tree. Each one was found on the same tree in New York during the fall season. The second mushroom varied from a yellowish to maroonish red color and looked like the a brain. It appeared to be growing off of stalks and some of them had depressions in the top of them. I'm not sure if the first mushroom I pictured here is the same as the other 3. You can see in this photo just how many different fungi were growing on this tree. Thanks to anyone who can help identify this mushroom.
  22. Hello, I'm a complete novice when it comes to mushrooms. Recently I stumbled upon a fallen Beech tree and I was impressed with the many different kinds of fungi were growing from it. I'm hoping you guys can perhaps identify a few. The forum rules state that you can only ask for identification of one mushroom per thread, so I am going to post multiple threads asking for identification of each mushroom on the tree. Each one was found on the same tree in New York during the fall season. For the first mushroom I'm not sure if this is one species or two separate ones. I thought perhaps the latter two were juvenile versions of the first, but of course I have no idea. The latter two are darker in color, smaller, rounder, have more puss looking things growing on them and grew under the bark of the tree. If any of you guys can identify these I would greatly appreciate it, thank you.
  23. Hi guys, i went hiking at about 1200m altitude in a fir forest after rainfall and found lots of lactarius. I also found a mushroom that looked a bit like lactarius, but wasnt. The stem was a bit different, and even though the cap was a bit orange, the gills were white. In the first two photos the bottom left mushroom is a lactarius, the other three are - maybe Hygrophorus pudorinus? The mushrooms in the other photos i have no idea what they are. They were found a bit higher - around 1400m. Maybe some sort of coprinus? According to my guide though, Coprinus Comatus has white scales on the cap. I dont know... any ideas?
  24. I found these mushrooms growing on the side of an oak tree, I presume they are the same species by how similar they look, though they might not be. They both have a reddish cap with rings that can be grayish in some areas. The cap has a very firm woody texture as does the entire mushroom. The underside appears to be Polyporus and is also very firm. The underside is white. The underside bruises brown when pressure is applied. The mushroom smells like a regular mushroom.
  25. I found these white mushrooms growing on a tree in a cluster formation. The cap surface is white, kinda furry but almost spongy, very moist, If I squeeze the cap water comes out. The underside is probably the strangest part as I haven't seen a mushroom like it. It has long fibers almost like a toothbrush. Smells like a normal mushroom.
  26. I found these polypore mushrooms growing on some old oak logs. The mushrooms have colors in rings thought they definetly aren't Turkey Tail. Brown to tan. The caps are smooth yet rather rugged on some. The underside is white The mushrooms have a regular mushroom smell They were growing on the side of oak. It seems like they are the same species however, two individuals, pictured last, seem to have slightly different coloring and or ring formation.
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