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  1. Today
  2. Mostly around poplars but I have found some in around Oak woods. The blacks here seem to prefer dark, dense woods. The north slopes or I have seen bomb craters and sinkholes in the woods that just fill up with blacks! They seem to have a need for much damper, richer soil than the yellows do. The half frees or "spikes" as we refer to them are often found standing in water. Any woods edge that gets enough light and has a very damp to wet soil will produce. A few years ago it was an extremely wet spring. I found 600 spikes on our little 3 acres that is only about half wooded. Most years I would find maybe a dozen and many years none at all. Wade
  3. I think that while the ash are dying there will be more morels. But, once these trees are completely dead --as most are in my area-- I think the morels will be set back. Interesting question about the yellows found where there are ash trees. Those spots seem to have continued to produce yellow morels. Actually, my local spot where the blacks have tailed off these past few years is the same general area where I get yellows. But, I have noticed that where the ash trees died --and there are no tulip poplar nearby-- the yellow morels have stopped. These spots produced nice flushes of large yellows while the ash were dying. But other morel patches near ash (mainly dead) mixed with tulip poplar have continued to produce yellows, both Morchella diminutiva and Morchella americana. I think the M. americana --the large yellows-- have been reacting to the dying ash. Also, I think the M. diminutiva is mainly associated with tulip poplar (these small morels are often referred to a "Tulip Morels"). M. americana seems to associate with both ash and tulip poplar. I suspect the Morchella angusticeps will revive in the areas with tulip poplar trees, and at some point in the future there will be good Black Morel years... as long as the tulip poplar stays healthy. The "dead/damaged partner-tree" situation seems to be a motif for which Morchella americana reacts by producing significant flushes (eg. dead elms, dying apple trees, ash). The reproductive cycles of the blacks (M. angusticeps) seems to be more mysterious. Wade, what types of habitat produce Black Morels in your area?
  4. We hardly ever find blacks around ash. It is a great spot to find yellows though. If your blacks are no longer growing around ash that have died, what about the yellows? I have heard speculation that the dying ash would increase the morel population for many years to come. It sounds like you are experiencing the exact opposite results. Wade
  5. Hepatica and fiddleheads are appearing in my local early morel spot. But no morels yet. This spot had produced 100s of Black Morels each of several different years during the first decade of the 2000s. During that time the Emerald Ash Borer infestation was killing off the white ash trees, and I think this may have stimulated the large flushes of Black Morels at that time. Ash is (very likely) a symbiotic associate of Morchella angusticeps. Now that most of the ash have died, the numbers of morels are way down. Although... other spots where I have found Black Morels that feature mostly tulip poplar trees have also been producing fewer Black Morels during the past 6 or so years. The weather this spring leading up to now seems to have been very good to usher in the early morels... no hard freeze for the past 2-3 weeks, slightly above average temps, some sunny days, and plenty of rainfall. Well, perhaps too much rainfall. Spots that are usually well-drained are currently pretty soggy.
  6. Looks like some old Oyster Mushrooms that probably have repeatedly frozen/thawed. .
  7. If those are oysters, they are very old, so color can't be used for identification. Everything gets brown when that old.
  8. Yesterday
  9. I was wondering if anyone is able to ID these mushrooms I found earlier today and was curious because I’ve searched multiple books and can’t find any strains that match theses
  10. Last week
  11. Dave W

    morels?

    I find the Devil's Urns in hardwood forests where Black Morels are also found. Seeing the urns lets me know that --as long as the weather cooperates-- the morels are no more than one week away.
  12. svs

    morels?

    Thank you Dave, I do not remember seeing Devil's Urns in NJ but I will pay attention now. Do they like similar habitats as Morels?
  13. When collecting morels from old apple orchards here in eastern NA --especially large orchards where apples have/had been a main cash crop-- it is advisable to test the soil for lead (or consult anyone who knows the history of the orchard). For about 100 years the pesticide lead-arsenate had been sprayed onto apple trees, and in some old orchards the soil is contaminated with this toxin. Morels are known to uptake toxins from their habitat. I checked my local early spot today, none yet but we are close to the first morels here in NE PA.
  14. Dave W

    morels?

    Probably the classic North American Yellow Morel species, Morchella americana (previously M. esculenta and briefly M. esculentoides). Up here in NE PA I checked a spot for early morels today (eastern NA Black Morels, M. angusticeps). None yet. But I saw some Devil's Urns (Urnula craterium), a species which generally fruits about one week in advance of the Black Morels.
  15. Evan

    morels?

    You definitely have yellow morels! Congrats!!
  16. svs

    morels?

    South, Cherry Hill area
  17. Bowguy

    morels?

    I’m a new member so I’ll hold any thoughts as to I’d but what part of nj? Don’t want location North South or Central would be vague enough I’d hope
  18. I am pretty confident that this is a Yellow Morel but please confirm just to be sure. Found this for the first time in New Jersey
  19. I have a close friend that takes me and my wife mushroom hunting near Mt. Lassen. We hunt morels in the spring and chanterelles in early summer and we have caught the bug. I want to learn more about the wild edible incredibles because they fascinate me. My wife and I are in our 60's, still working and hope to retire soon. We savor our free time and try to spend a decent amount of it in nature. It's good to be here and I'm looking forward to making many friends. Thanks to those who make this site available.
  20. I have a close friend that takes me and my wife mushroom hunting near Mt. Lassen. We hunt morels in the spring and chanterelles in early summer and we have caught the bug. I want to learn more about the wild edible incredibles because they fascinate me. My wife and I are in our 60's, still working and hope to retire soon. We savor our free time and try to spend a decent amount of it in nature. It's good to be here and I'm looking forward to making many friends. Thanks to those who make this site available.
  21. I’m in DSM as well, and those look identical to some oysters I found on an elm stump at my folks’. Check back every month for new growth, seemed to be about how often new mushrooms came back
  22. Morning Dave , as always thanks so much for your insight. Used to hunt morels growing up in Missouri but his will be my first attempt up here. May try an old orchard in NJ next week and see. Lower elevation and warmer temps there. Had a warm night last night with a lot of rain followed by warm temps forecasted today. Hopefully that gets things going
  23. It varies annually according to the weather. Also, elevation above sea level and aspect of the habitat you're hunting (north/south facing). I think first two weeks of May should be a good time to look for yellow morels in Pike County. If you know a spot where blacks occur, then maybe April 25 or so.
  24. This latest spore print looks more like what I'd expect from a species of Leratiomyces. The previous photos of the lighter spore print likely represent a species of either Hebeloma or Psathyrella. Looks like you've got at least two different species growing in those wood chips. You can get a lot of good info from a scope that magnifies to 400x.
  25. Earlier
  26. I did another spore print. This time I am using natural lighting, and have included the actual cap from which the print was taken in the picture. In the "before" picture you can clearly see the yellow hue my interior lighting created. The print definitely has a slight purple to it. I would be highly interested in finding someone with a microscope - how fancy of a microscope would I need? or will one from a high school chemistry class be sufficient?
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